Anacostia Reshaped: The D.C. neighborhood is facing unprecedented change through a series of development projects inside and outside its borders | Washington Business Journal

February 04, 2022
  • D.C. Policy Center
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Food deserts in D.C. - Randy Smith, D.C. Policy Center. (Source)

On February 4, 2021, the D.C. Policy Center’s article, Food access in D.C is deeply connected to poverty and transportation, was cited by the Washington Business Journal:

A walk down Martin Luther King Jr. Avenue SE from Good Hope Road toward Morris Road reveals cranes and a string of rising projects, adding to what has long been the area’s quirkiest landmark, an oversized chair. Callender and Hallums’ project — part of a major development dubbed Bridge District that’s promising more than 700 homes, restaurant space and a grocery retailer to its west — is but one of the numerous projects on the books. 

But even amid those plans, not nearly enough has changed. The area median income in Anacostia’s northwest portion is $35,750, sliding down to $17,159 in its eastern sections. It’s still designated a food desert, according to the D.C. Policy Center. More than half of area residents have no access to a car. Covid-19 and its disproportionate onslaught on communities of color just made things worse.

Read more: Anacostia Reshaped: The D.C. neighborhood is facing unprecedented change through a series of development projects inside and outside its borders | Washington Business Journal

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D.C. Policy Center


Established in 2016, the D.C. Policy Center is a non-partisan research and policy organization committed to advancing policies for a strong and vibrant economy in the District of Columbia. Through rigorous research and collaboration, the D.C. Policy Center develops and tests policy ideas, disseminates its findings, and engages in constructive dialogue and debate.

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