The Funding Landscape of Out-of-School Time Programs in the District of Columbia: Full Report

March 29, 2019
  • Yesim Sayin
  • Kathryn Zickuhr
Featured Image
photo/ Alicia Pimental/Chesapeake Bay Program. CC BY-NC 2.0 (Source)

This report, “The Funding Landscape of Out-of-School Time Programs in the District of Columbia: Sources of Funds, Uses of Funds, and Financing Gaps,” describes the current funding landscape of out-of-school time (OST) programs in the District of Columbia. It explores where funding for OST programs comes from, where funds are distributed, and how these funds are used. The report also explores the potential fiscal needs of expanding OST programs, opportunities that are available to expand and better use existing funds, and bottlenecks that might impair expansion efforts.

Report contents

  • Part I. Introduction: OST Programs in the District of Columbia
  • Part II. Sources of OST Program Funding
  • Part III. OST Program Expenditures
  • Part IV. Challenges and Opportunities
  • Part V. Recommendations
  • Appendix A. Data Sources and Methods
  • Appendix B. Additional Data on Government-Operated Program Expenditures
  • Appendix C. National Research on Out-of-School Time Program Funding

Report materials

Acknowledgements

This report received support from the District of Columbia Office of the Deputy Mayor for Education to fulfill the Office of Out of School Time Grants and Youth Outcomes Establishment Act of 2016 requirement to conduct a citywide Out-of-School Time needs assessment. United Way of the National Capital Area commissioned the report.

This report would not have been possible without the cooperation of community-based OST providers, area foundations, District government officials, and other stakeholders who shared their experiences with researchers and responded to requests for information. Research Associate Simone Roy provided additional research and writing assistance.

Authors

Yesim Sayin

Executive Director
D.C. Policy Center

Yesim Sayin is the founding Executive Director of the D.C. Policy Center.

With over twenty years of public policy experience in the District of Columbia, Dr. Sayin is recognized by policymakers, advocates and the media as a source of reliable, balanced analyses on the District’s economy and demography.  Yesim’s research interests include economic and fiscal policy, urban economic development, housing, and education. She is especially focused on how COVID-19 pandemic is changing regional and interregional economic interdependencies and what this means for urban policy. Her work is frequently covered in the media, including the Washington Post, the Washington Business Journal, the New York Times, the Wall Street Journal, WAMU, and the Washington City Paper, among others.

Before joining the D.C. Policy Center, Dr. Sayin worked at the District of Columbia Office of the Chief Financial Officer leading the team that scored the fiscal impact of all legislation the District considered. She frequently testified on high profile legislation and worked closely with the executive and Council staff to ensure that policymakers fully understand the fiscal implications of their proposed legislation. Yesim also has worked in the private sector, and consulted with international organization on a large portfolio of public finance topics.

Yesim holds a Ph.D. in economics from George Mason University in Fairfax, Virginia, and a bachelor’s degree in Political Science and International Relations from Bogazici University, located in Istanbul, Turkey. 

Kathryn Zickuhr

Former Director of Policy
D.C. Policy Center

Kathryn Zickuhr served on the D.C. Policy Center staff as the Director of Policy from its founding until May 2020.

Prior to joining the Center in January 2017, Kathryn was a research analyst at the Pew Research Center’s Internet & Technology Project, where she studied topics such as the changing role of public libraries in American communities and the digital divide. Kathryn holds a Master of Public Policy degree from Georgetown University’s McCourt School of Public Policy and a Bachelor of Arts in history and Russian from the University of Kansas.