D.C. single family neighborhood density: Ward 3 versus Ward 6

July 29, 2019
  • Yesim Sayin
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Ward 3 and Ward 6 both include some of the most highly-valued residential neighborhoods in the District. Both are predominately composed of single-family homes, as shown in the maps above, yet the look and feel of each ward is strikingly different. Most of Ward 3 (shown in blue in the chart below) is composed of detached single-family homes in large lots, while residential areas in Ward 6 (shown in green) are mostly made up of row homes. As such, the housing density in Ward 6 is almost twice that of Ward 3.

These differences are important as we consider the future of housing affordability and inclusivity in D.C., as single-family zoning occupies 75 percent of all tax lots in D.C. and 43 percent of all surface area not owned by the federal government. As this example shows, even small increases in allowable density in single-family zones could have significant impacts across the District.

Learn more in our recent publication, Single-family zoning and neighborhood characteristics in the District of Columbia.

Author

Yesim Sayin

Executive Director
D.C. Policy Center

Yesim Sayin is the founding Executive Director of the D.C. Policy Center.

With over twenty years of public policy experience in the District of Columbia, Dr. Sayin is recognized by policymakers, advocates and the media as a source of reliable, balanced analyses on the District’s economy and demography.  Yesim’s research interests include economic and fiscal policy, urban economic development, housing, and education. She is especially focused on how COVID-19 pandemic is changing regional and interregional economic interdependencies and what this means for urban policy. Her work is frequently covered in the media, including the Washington Post, the Washington Business Journal, the New York Times, the Wall Street Journal, WAMU, and the Washington City Paper, among others.

Before joining the D.C. Policy Center, Dr. Sayin worked at the District of Columbia Office of the Chief Financial Officer leading the team that scored the fiscal impact of all legislation the District considered. She frequently testified on high profile legislation and worked closely with the executive and Council staff to ensure that policymakers fully understand the fiscal implications of their proposed legislation. Yesim also has worked in the private sector, and consulted with international organization on a large portfolio of public finance topics.

Yesim holds a Ph.D. in economics from George Mason University in Fairfax, Virginia, and a bachelor’s degree in Political Science and International Relations from Bogazici University, located in Istanbul, Turkey.