The Miles to the Grocery Store Got Longer This Year | Slate

April 09, 2021
  • D.C. Policy Center
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Photo/Ted Eytan. Used with permission.

On April 9, 2021, the D.C. Policy Center’s article, Food access in D.C is deeply connected to poverty and transportation, was cited by Slate:

Researchers define a food desert in D.C. as an area where there is no full-service grocery store within a half-mile and where 40 percent of the households don’t have a car. Median income in these areas must also be less than 185 percent of the federal poverty level for a family of four. A 2017 data analysis from the D.C. Policy Center found that more than half of those affected live in Ward 8 while 31 percent reside in Ward 7. More than 91 percent of the residents in both wards are Black.

Read more: The Miles to the Grocery Store Got Longer This Year | Slate

Related: Food access in D.C is deeply connected to poverty and transportation | D.C. Policy Center

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D.C. Policy Center


Established in 2016, the D.C. Policy Center is a non-partisan research and policy organization committed to advancing policies for a strong and vibrant economy in the District of Columbia. Through rigorous research and collaboration, the D.C. Policy Center develops and tests policy ideas, disseminates its findings, and engages in constructive dialogue and debate.

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