What happened to Chocolate City? Gentrification. | Washington Post

June 19, 2020
  • D.C. Policy Center
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Photo/Ted Eytan. Used with permission.

On June 19, 2020, the D.C. Policy Center’s article, Goodbye to Chocolate City, was cited in an opinion piece at the Washington Post:

 In 1970, our city was more than 70 percent African American, but what became of Chocolate City? In 2015, the city dropped to below 50 percent African American. It is conservatively estimated that more than 40,000 black families have been pushed out of the District in the past decade alone due to harmful policies that fuel the gentrification of D.C. neighborhoods. These policies, propelled by D.C. Mayor Muriel E. Bowser (D) and the D.C. Council, hide behind skewed definitions of “affordability” and use a regional, rather than a local, area median income (which includes some of the country’s richest counties).

Read more: What happened to Chocolate City? Gentrification. | Washington Post

Related: Goodbye to Chocolate City | D.C. Policy Center

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D.C. Policy Center


Established in 2016, the D.C. Policy Center is a non-partisan research and policy organization committed to advancing policies for a strong and vibrant economy in the District of Columbia. Through rigorous research and collaboration, the D.C. Policy Center develops and tests policy ideas, disseminates its findings, and engages in constructive dialogue and debate.

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