Results (493)

D.C. Council proposes more incentives to address office, retail vacancies | Washington Business Journal

Of 733 large buildings in D.C., about one in five are more than 25% empty and could rise to one in three if leasing activity does not increase, according to analysis of tax data from D.C. Policy Center, further stressing the city’s tax base.

December 1, 2022 | D.C. Policy Center

‘Wave of the future’: How DC’s million-dollar investment in tutoring is helping students catch up | WTOP

It’s called high-impact tutoring — at least 90 minutes of tutoring per week, divided across a few sessions before, during or after the school day, including immediate tutor feedback. Many sessions include three or fewer students, according to a D.C. Policy Center report.

November 30, 2022 | D.C. Policy Center

Highlighting internet disparities | Axios DC newsletter

Between the lines: Before the pandemic, 28% of D.C. households lacked access to broadband internet or a home computer, according to the D.C. Policy Center. This disparity was further highlighted by the rise in remote work and virtual learning during the pandemic.

November 28, 2022 | D.C. Policy Center

Office Giants Call For D.C. Government To Take Risk Of Distress More Seriously | Bisnow

There are 733 large office buildings in the office-heavy parts of the District today, of which 228 are more than 25% vacant or are likely to become vacant in the next two years as tenants leave with no one to replace them, according to a data analysis by the D.C. Policy Center. Those buildings, in turn, could trade for bargain prices and potentially depress the values of similar properties.

November 28, 2022 | D.C. Policy Center

Opinion: D.C.’s downtown is comatose. Here’s how to revive it | Washington Post

At the same time, leaders of America’s biggest cities are grasping the fact that remote and hybrid work are here to stay. A D.C. Policy Center report in May summed up the city’s challenge: “Our best estimate is that of the 401,481 workers who commuted to D.C. from elsewhere prior to the pandemic, 155,550 can do their jobs from home.” There simply won’t be as much need for office space going forward. That’s a massive problem for downtown D.C.‚ which the mayor’s office says consists of more than 90 percent commercial space and only 8 percent residential.

November 23, 2022 | D.C. Policy Center

Bowser and Grant Celebrate Record D.C. School Enrollment | Washington Informer

On November 16, 2022, the D.C. Policy Center’s report, Declining births and lower demand: Charting the future of public school enrollment in D.C., was cited by the Washington Informer: The DC Policy Center released a study earlier this year that highlighted declining pre-school and elementary school enrollment in the pre-pandemic years. This had especially…

November 16, 2022 | D.C. Policy Center

D.C. school enrollment hits 15-year high, mayor says | Washington Post

The figure represents an increase of almost 3 percent from last school year, or about 2,600 more students, according to preliminary data from the Office of the State Superintendent of Education (OSSE). Before the pandemic, public school enrollment had been growing by an average of about 1,600 students every school year since the 2007-2008 academic year, according to the D.C. Policy Center, a local research group. That progress stalled during the public health crisis.

November 14, 2022 | D.C. Policy Center

Enrollment in D.C. Public Schools Is Back Up After Dipping During The Pandemic | DCist

A July report by the D.C. Policy Center predicted enrollment in D.C.’s public schools could drop by 6,000 students — the equivalent of 16 average-sized schools — over the next five years, driven by falling birth rates and lower demand for living in the District due to the pandemic. “An enrollment decline of this magnitude would have significant implications for D.C.’s public schools.”

November 14, 2022 | D.C. Policy Center

How Metro’s $2 fares have fared | Axios

On November 7, 2022, D.C. Policy Center Executive Director Yesim Sayin was quoted by Axios: Yes, but: There are a few factors besides the price drop that could be contributing to weekend ridership’s rebound.  Historically, Metro has largely been used by commuters during the week — fewer weekend riders means a smaller pool…

November 7, 2022 | D.C. Policy Center

Apples to hand grenades: Why transit fare evasion is an untimely distraction | Greater Greater Washington

On October 4, 2022, D.C. Policy Center analysis on Metro’s Kids Ride Free program was cited by Greater Greater Washington: Take the Kids Ride Free program, for which every District student from age 5–21 is eligible. Distribution of SmarTrip cards for Kids Ride Free is poor, estimated at 38% last year by DC…

October 7, 2022 | D.C. Policy Center

D.C. sets ambitious goal of 20,000 new Black homeowners by 2030 | WAMU

On October 3, 2022, the D.C. Policy Center’s analysis, How the region’s racial and ethnic demographics have changed since 1970, was cited by WAMU: Just 34% of Black residents own their home, a 12 point drop from the 46% Black homeownership rate in 2005, according to a report from various housing experts convened by…

October 7, 2022 | D.C. Policy Center

Lidl opens doors to its first DC grocery store | Fox 5

The location at 2224 Town Center Drive SE is the first new grocery store in Ward 7 in over a decade. Local leaders hope the new store will address gaps in access to food for residents in neighborhoods east of the Anacostia River. 80 percent of D.C.’s food deserts were in Ward 7 and Ward 8  in 2017, according to D.C. Policy Center. 

October 6, 2022 | D.C. Policy Center

D.C. Sets Ambitious Goal Of 20,000 New Black Homeowners By 2030 | DCist

Just 34% of Black residents own their home, a 12 point drop from the 46% Black homeownership rate in 2005, according to a report from various housing experts convened by the mayor. Meanwhile, homeownership has increased for white residents over that same time period, hovering around 49%. D.C. has also seen a decline in Black residents over that time, falling to 49.2 percent by 2011 according to the D.C. Policy Center.

October 3, 2022 | D.C. Policy Center

D.C. saw a wave of new businesses during Covid-19. Supporting them is key to recovery, study says. | Washington Business Journal

Seventy-six percent of establishments in D.C. are small businesses with less than 500, and they account for 49% of its employment and 43% of its annual payroll. Even businesses under 50 employees count for one in five jobs in the District. So, it’s all the more important to find ways to keep them here, especially as remote work has proven its usefulness and “can’t be legislated away,” said Yesim Sayin, executive director of the D.C. Policy Center.

September 30, 2022 | D.C. Policy Center

WMATA’s Silver Line hopes to find success | Axios DC

D.C. Policy Center executive director Yesim Sayin Taylor tells Axios that the Washington region’s high concentration of workers who are able to do their jobs remotely has continued to make it even harder for Metro to rebound from pandemic losses. 

September 29, 2022 |

Washington D.C. Economic Partnership to take more active role in bringing companies downtown | Washington Business Journal

Sellars said this entity will be focused just on D.C., which has had far less success than both Maryland and Virginia in attracting companies and generating jobs thus far. Of 120 large headquarters that have moved to Greater Washington this century, just 16 have come to the District itself, according to research from D.C. Policy Center, and the city is losing 2.4 jobs for every job it adds.

September 22, 2022 | D.C. Policy Center

What experts say needs to be done to disrupt historic patterns of segregation in DC’s schools | Greater Greater Washington

While a 2018 study found that giving at-risk students a higher priority would improve outcomes for just 8.2% of at-risk participants, a 2020 study by DC Policy Center was much more promising. They looked specifically at charter schools with long waitlists that had just 15% of at-risk students enrolled (city-wide, 45% of students are at-risk). At these schools, given the preference siblings get in the lottery, it was hard for at-risk students to snag a coveted spot.

September 19, 2022 | D.C. Policy Center

The ripple effects of how – and if – kids are able to commute safely to school | Greater Greater Washington

Research by the DC Policy Center found that in 2021 almost 80% of people lived within half a mile of a homicide (which are on the rise in DC) occurring that year. Black residents, however, are 19 percentage points more likely than their white peers to live within that radius.

September 15, 2022 | D.C. Policy Center

The D.C. Housing Authority Pays Top Dollar To Landlords In Wealthy Areas. Some Say That’s Bad Policy. | DCist

D.C.’s nearly 40-year-old rent control law caps annual rent increases at the rate of inflation plus 2% at larger apartment buildings constructed before 1976. Roughly one third of rental units in D.C. fall under rent control, but that number has decreased over time, according to the D.C. Policy Center.

September 13, 2022 | D.C. Policy Center

D.C. launches grant program to expand early child care facilities | Axios DC

According to the D.C. Fiscal Policy Institute, early childhood educators, who are predominantly Black and brown, earn a median annual income of approximately $31,950 — barely above minimum wage and not on par with public school teachers. The median teacher pay in D.C. is just over $81,000, says the D.C. Policy Center.

September 13, 2022 | D.C. Policy Center

How school boundaries and feeder patterns shape DC’s housing and education inequalities | Greater Greater Washington

At-risk kids are also less likely to get into their lottery choices. A major reason is that the lottery gives preference to siblings, according to research by the D.C. Policy Center, which tends to maintain school demographics rather than disrupt them.

September 2, 2022 | D.C. Policy Center

Navigating the wilderness, avoiding predators urban and rural | Washington Post

A report in June by the D.C. Policy Center noted that just being in proximity to repeated criminal acts can have a deleterious effect on mental and physical health. The study found that 80 percent of District residents lived within a half-mile of a homicide in 2021. However, in wealthy and predominantly White Ward 3, there were only two homicides, and no one lived within a half-mile of either killing.

August 30, 2022 | D.C. Policy Center

Q&A: Tackling the achievement gap with Chelsea Coffin, director of Education Policy at D.C. Policy Center | The Afro

Chelsea Coffin joined the D.C. Policy Center in 2017 as the Director of the Education Policy Initiative, which seeks to use new data and information to improve outcomes for District students— especially, those that are underprivileged. The AFRO connected with Coffin to learn more about tackling the achievement gap and the importance of diversity in the classroom. The conversation below has been edited for length and clarity. 

August 5, 2022 | D.C. Policy Center

D.C. Schools Face Major Substitute Teacher Shortage: Analysis | Washington Informer

On August 3, 2022, the D.C. Policy Center’s Chart of the week, Ongoing substitute teacher shortages affect schools’ ability to function, was cited by the Washington Informer: D.C. Public Schools may face a huge shortage of substitute teachers in the upcoming academic year, which could have an impact on classrooms and school…

August 4, 2022 | D.C. Policy Center

Nationals Fans Have Lost Hope. Here’s Why They Shouldn’t | City Cast DC

Meanwhile, with three weeks to go until school starts back up, DC Public Schools is facing a serious shortage of substitute teachers. The number of subs has dropped by 50 percent in the past two years, according to a new D.C. Policy Center report. A lot teachers say they’re quitting because of low pay, lack of benefits, and COVID concerns.

August 4, 2022 | D.C. Policy Center

DC Substitute Teachers Cite Low Pay, Lack of Benefits for ‘Mass Exodus’ | NBC 4

According to a recent analysis from local research group D.C. Policy Center, the number of substitutes on the DCPS payroll has gone down from 987 at the start of 2020 to 501 in the first quarter of 2022. It’s not known exactly how many substitutes there are going into the upcoming school year, as D.C.’s public employee salary database has yet to update with the most recent quarter’s data.

August 2, 2022 | D.C. Policy Center

Office Conversions Are Good for Cities | The American Conservative

On July 30, 2022, the D.C. Policy Center’s article, Examining office to residential conversions in the District, was cited by The American Conservative: An analysis by the D.C. Policy Center found that while a Class C office building could increase in value if converted to residential, converting it to Class A would yield…

August 1, 2022 | D.C. Policy Center

These are the hottest neighborhoods in D.C. | City Cast DC

On July 25, 2022, a map from the D.C. Policy Center’s article, D.C.’s heat islands, was cited by City Cast DC: The last few days have been some of the most wretchedly hot ones I’ve seen in D.C. Apparently, D.C. is an urban heat island (a.k.a it’s hotter than neighboring counties, lucky us). However,…

August 1, 2022 | D.C. Policy Center

Report shows enrollment in DC schools is down and projected to continue to decline | WJLA

A report by the DC Policy Center shows enrollment growth stalled in D.C. schools during the pandemic and if the trend continues, an enrollment that currently stands at 87,000 could decline to 81,000 by 2026.

July 18, 2022 | D.C. Policy Center

D.C. school enrollment expected to drop after years of increases | Washington Post

Enrollment in D.C.’s traditional public and charter schools is expected to drop over the next five years, a disappointing turn for a city that had celebrated more than a decade of growth in its public schools. The current enrollment stagnation and anticipated decrease in the coming years — according to a study released Wednesday by the local research group D.C. Policy Center — was propelled by declining birthrates and adults leaving the city or pulling their children out of public schools during the pandemic.

July 14, 2022 | D.C. Policy Center

Study reveals decline in DC school enrollment, what’s expected in coming years | WTOP

School enrollment numbers in D.C. are projected to decline, the latest shift after years of growth in its public and charter schools.

July 14, 2022 | D.C. Policy Center

Remote work and housing costs: D.C.’s new economic development plan will consider pandemic’s impact | Washington Business Journal

Even if employees do come back a few days a week they’ll be spending less. If the estimated 155,000 who commute into D.C. from nearby came in just days a week, D.C. would lose out on $62.9 million a year in sales tax revenue, according to the analysis. Yesim Sayin, its executive director, said that puts more importance on a strategy that proves a value of in-person work.

July 14, 2022 | D.C. Policy Center

Black-owned stores work to end D.C.’s food deserts | Washington Post

On July 7, 2022, the D.C. Policy Center’s article, Food access in D.C is deeply connected to poverty and transportation, was cited by the Washington Post: Wards 7 and 8 lost four of their seven full-service grocery stores between 2010 and 2020, while the city’s other six wards gained 37 grocery stores…

July 7, 2022 | D.C. Policy Center

Thousands of DC kids were exposed to gun violence in 2021. This group is working to stop the spread | WUSA 9

Data showing how many D.C. kids are impacted by shootings reflects just how important that support is.The DC Policy Centermapped it out. “On average, when a homicide happened in DC [in 2021], there were about 2,800 kids that were nearby,” executive director of the center, Yesim Sayin said. Sayin said in areas that see more violent crime, that number can get up into the hundreds of thousands.

June 29, 2022 | D.C. Policy Center

What Really Happens When Dollar Stores Replace Grocers | Mashed

The Anacostia River branches off the Potomac just two miles due south of the U.S. Capitol building near the Nationals baseball stadium, running through Washington, D.C. past the National Arboretum, and into Maryland. Across the 11th Street bridge is a low-income and predominantly-Black neighborhood (per Statistical Atlas) which, on a map published by the D.C. Policy Center, is lit up with blue dots, each marking a bodega or corner store. The area contains only two full-service grocers — which, as the map shows, are abundant and accessible everywhere north and west of the river.

June 21, 2022 | D.C. Policy Center

Urban exodus that began during pandemic shows no signs of slowing down | Washington Examiner

On June 20, 2022, the D.C. Policy Center’s article, Charts of the week: A pandemic-induced exodus has broken the District’s population boom, was cited by the Washington Examiner: The availability of remote work, the persistence of pandemic-related restrictions, and the rise of crime and inflation have all contributed to a stream of…

June 21, 2022 | D.C. Policy Center

Giant Close To Deal For 55K SF Store Where Walmart Infamously Changed Course | Bisnow

“Bowser has directed several new initiatives to address food insecurity in Wards 7 and 8, where the D.C. Policy Center estimates 82% of the city’s food deserts lie.”

June 16, 2022 | D.C. Policy Center

Understanding why the region grapples with unequal access to TOD | Greater Greater Washington

High-income earners eventually started returning to the city, and so did the jobs, according to a DC Policy Center study. Growth in DC, according to the DC Policy Center, was driven by young people between the ages of 25-35 in the early 2000s. Areas like Fairfax, Montgomery, and Prince George’s also experienced huge spikes in population growth. And TOD sprouted up in places throughout the District as more and more people wanted to be able to walk to their destinations.

June 14, 2022 | D.C. Policy Center

Deanwood neighborhood center with grocery store clears major hurdle | Washington Business Journal

Medici Road has been working for over a year to resurrect what is now an overgrown lot on a main neighborhood thoroughfare within the Deanwood policy focus area, which emphasizes infill development, especially with neighborhood-serving retail. Advisory Neighborhood Council 7C supported the project, noting the corridor has much under-used land, and the grocery store has been a popular demand in an area the D.C. Policy Center designates as a food desert. The grocery store and coffee shop users haven’t been made public, Jackson said.

June 13, 2022 | D.C. Policy Center

D.C. bypasses national public school enrollment drop | Axios DC

D.C.’s high school graduation rate was on the decline for years, D.C. Policy Center’s Education Policy Initiative director Chelsea Coffin tells Axios. But it increased during the pandemic as some graduation requirements were relaxed or waived. What to watch: Coffin says the decrease in D.C. births will impact public school enrollment in the future, especially for younger students.

June 1, 2022 | D.C. Policy Center

Nation’s capital grapples with violence, juvenile crime as DC leaders look for answers | Fox News

D.C.’s population fell by about 3%, representing a loss of more than 20,000 residents, in 2021, the D.C. Policy Center reported on March 25, citing data from the U.S. Census Bureau.

May 9, 2022 | D.C. Policy Center

Masks on Metro? | The D.C. Line

On April 20, 2022, The D.C. Policy Center’s article, D.C. Voices: D.C. schools ramped up mental health resources during the pandemic. How well do these services address student needs?, was cited by The D.C. Line: The D.C. Policy Center has a new analysis of the extra mental health resources provided by DC schools during…

April 20, 2022 | D.C. Policy Center

Not easy being Orange | 730DC

On April 15, 2022, the D.C. Policy Center’s article, Do residential properties in D.C.’s historic districts outperform the rest of the city in value appreciation?, was cited by 730DC: Appreciating historyContrary to what you might expect, homes in DC’s historic districts have actually risen less in value. Read more: Not easy being Orange…

April 15, 2022 | D.C. Policy Center

Breakfast links: Prince George’s County receives $2.5 billion for economic growth | Greater Greater Washington

On April 14, 2022, the D.C. Policy Center’s article, Do residential properties in D.C.’s historic districts outperform the rest of the city in value appreciation?, was cited by Greater Greater Washington: Residential properties in DC’s historic areas have underperformed in value appreciation compared to homes in the rest of the city, despite the properties…

April 14, 2022 | D.C. Policy Center

Groups call on D.C. to classify more kids as at-risk for academic failure | Washington Post

The D.C. Policy Center, a local research group, crunched the numbers and determined that expanding the eligibility for at-risk funds could cost the city anywhere between $20 and $33 million each year. Analysts figured that many children who would fall under these new categories already qualify for at-risk funding because their families qualify for food stamps.

April 9, 2022 | D.C. Policy Center

Mendelson Taps Ex-D.C. Mayor Williams to Lead Tax Commission | Washington Informer

D.C. Council Chairman Phil Mendelson announced he has appointed former Mayor Anthony Williams as chairman of the D.C. Tax Revision Commission, as well as five other members… the appointees to the commission are Rahsaan G. Bernard, president of Building Bridges Across the River; Erica Williams, executive director of the DC Fiscal Policy Institute; Yesim Taylor, executive director of the DC Policy Center…

April 5, 2022 |

Morning newsletter: D.C. struggles to retain millennials | Axios DC

The District is no longer attracting as many of the young and well-educated adults who have fueled its recent population growth, census data shows. The migration of young people over the past two decades led to an increase in public school enrollment, new development, and more tax revenue for the District. But the number of people aged 25 to 34 moving into the city has slowed in the past four years, further declining during the pandemic, local think tank D.C. Policy Center found.

March 28, 2022 | D.C. Policy Center

Swimming in money — but how soon will the drought come, and what’s the plan? | The DC Line

On March 24, 2022, the D.C. Policy Center’s article, Chart of the week: Mayor Bowser’s FY 2023 proposed budget, was cited by The DC Line: If folks want to understand what irresponsible financial planning and management look like, they need only review the recent Chart of the Week published by the D.C. Policy…

March 24, 2022 | D.C. Policy Center

Do you live in a DC apartment building? Take our survey and tell us about your “high-rise life” | Forest Hills Connection

The majority of DC residents rent their homes, and in 2019, when the D.C. Policy Center was collecting data for its 2020 report on rental housing in the District, 60 percent of rental units were in apartment buildings. That’s 124,641 apartment units, in 3,121 buildings. And we’d like to know more about what it’s like to live in them.

March 23, 2022 | D.C. Policy Center

“I break things and put them back together again” | 730DC

Adults ages 25-34 left DC in record numbers during the pandemic, new data shows. This is worrisome not just because you have to make new friends now*, but because maintaining a net inflow of young adult workers can be crucial to a city’s ability to attract new business and maintain what the D.C. Policy Center calls “strong fiscal health.”

March 21, 2022 | D.C. Policy Center

D.C.’s Moving Target: Prince George’s County is steadily absorbing movers from D.C. | Washington Business Journal

Overall, the D.C. Policy Center has found that domestic in-migration into the nation’s capital in particular had turned negative in 2019, remaining that way through the pandemic. For every resident who moved into D.C. from the nearby suburbs in recent years, two moved out, and household formation markedly slowed, according to the center.

March 18, 2022 | D.C. Policy Center

Breakfast links: How DC’s population has changed in the COVID era | Greater Greater Washington

Educated young adults have left DC at historic levels during the pandemic and are no longer moving to the District at the rate of years past. DC also lost workers in key industries, particularly those with more remote-eligible jobs.

March 18, 2022 | D.C. Policy Center

District Links: New research initiative eyes DC’s competitiveness in post-COVID economy | The DC Line

On March 8, 2022, D.C. Policy Center’s launch of the Alice M. Rivlin Initiative for Economic Policy & Competitiveness, was covered by The DC Line: A new research project — named in honor of the late economist and DC advocate Alice Rivlin — will delve into the District’s competitive standing and ways to attract…

March 8, 2022 | D.C. Policy Center

D.C. struggled to compete before the pandemic. A new research group is studying how Covid changed that. | Washington Business Journal

The D.C. Policy Center is launching a major effort to study the District’s economic competitiveness and just how much the pandemic has moved that needle.

The new project — to be called the Alice M. Rivlin Initiative for Economic Policy & Competitiveness, in honor of the late D.C. economist — will study both D.C.’s economic policies and the effects of Covid-19, with an eye toward achieving more inclusive economic growth.

March 8, 2022 | D.C. Policy Center

Anacostia Reshaped: The D.C. neighborhood is facing unprecedented change through a series of development projects inside and outside its borders | Washington Business Journal

“A walk down Martin Luther King Jr. Avenue SE from Good Hope Road toward Morris Road reveals cranes and a string of rising projects, adding to what has long been the area’s quirkiest landmark, an oversized chair…But even amid those plans, not nearly enough has changed. The area median income in Anacostia’s northwest portion is $35,750, sliding down to $17,159 in its eastern sections. It’s still designated a food desert, according to the D.C. Policy Center. More than half of area residents have no access to a car.”

February 4, 2022 | D.C. Policy Center

Corporate naming raises concerns in D.C. | Axios DC

D.C. Policy Center executive director Yesim Sayin Taylor tells Axios that because the pandemic pushed workers away from downtown and out of D.C., new businesses are more important now than ever.

February 3, 2022 | D.C. Policy Center

Bowser Calls For Eminent Domain To Bring 55K SF Grocery Store To Ward 7 | Bisnow

Approximately 82% of the city’s food deserts — areas where residents have low rates of car access, a high poverty rate and are located more than half a mile from a grocery store or supermarket—occur in Wards 7 and 8, and that trend has persisted for decades, according to research by the D.C. Policy Center.

January 27, 2022 | D.C. Policy Center

TOPA Has Tanked D.C.’s Multifamily Sales Market | Bisnow

Yesim Sayin Taylor, executive director of the D.C. Policy Center, said the city should consider how it wants TOPA to influence its affordable housing priorities. She said a shortened timeline or even waiver of the TOPA process for housing operators with a commitment to affordability should be on the table as the city moves out of the pandemic.

January 25, 2022 | D.C. Policy Center

5 things we can achieve together with a new playbook | Washington Business Journal

Yet, according to the Brookings Metro Monitor 2021 report, Greater Washington ranks 51st among 53 large metro areas for racial inclusion, or the gap between the white population and people of color on key poverty indicators. In addition, the DC Policy Center found that even when District-born and raised youth find jobs, they are likely to be in low-paying occupations with little opportunity for economic mobility.

January 3, 2022 | D.C. Policy Center

The American Addiction to Speeding | Slate

Some civil rights advocates oppose automated enforcement on the grounds that even race-blind cameras are used to scale up America’s traditions of revenue-driven and racist policing. In D.C., for example, researchers found that drivers in segregated Black neighborhoods received 17 times as many camera tickets per capita as their counterparts in white neighborhoods. Black Washingtonians are indeed more likely to live near high-speed arterials where drivers (including white suburbanites) go very fast, but the disparity suggests the cameras aren’t improving driver safety so much as raising money.

December 15, 2021 | D.C. Policy Center

‘At-risk’ D.C. students to get priority in pre-K lottery | Washington Post

A 2020 study conducted by the D.C. Policy Center found that prioritizing at-risk students had the potential to improve their chance “to match at a school they have ranked and to increase socioeconomic diversity, especially at a subset of schools that serve low percentages of students who are at-risk.” The study said sibling preference preserved schools’ preexisting demographics by making it harder for students without siblings at a school to get in.

December 11, 2021 | D.C. Policy Center

The Federal Government Is Embracing Telework. Can D.C.’s Economy Survive It? | DCist

Increasingly, it looks like office owners downtown need to start considering a range of possibilities for their buildings, according to the D.C. Policy Center. Office vacancies were already rising before the pandemic, says a recent report from the think tank, and neighborhoods with a combination of commercial and residential space proved to be more resilient during the crisis.

December 9, 2021 | D.C. Policy Center

“The Perfect Tax”: Land Value Taxation and the Housing Crisis | Brown Political Review

An example from the D.C. Policy Center is informative: The owner of a single-family home can increase the value of the property by replacing the single-family home with a duplex or triplex while still paying the same in taxes under a system of land value taxation, reducing the average tax burden per unit. In contrast, under the standard property tax regime, this increased densification would result in a higher property tax burden due to the increased value of the property, and the landowner may decide not to undertake this improvement.

December 3, 2021 | D.C. Policy Center

Breakfast links: Purple Line construction is affecting small businesses. A proposed grant program could help. | Greater Greater Washington

Mixed use neighborhoods with a heavy office presence have proved more resilient to the effects of the pandemic than office-heavy downtown areas, which have been seeing more vacancies.  (Bailey McConnell / DC Policy Center)

December 1, 2021 | D.C. Policy Center

Enrollment In D.C. Public Schools Drops For Second Year In A Row | DCist

Most students who left their schools at the end of last year did not transfer to another campus within the city but moved out of the District entirely, according to city officials. It is hard to pinpoint exactly how many of those departures are because of the pandemic. Chelsea Coffin, who directs education research at the D.C. Policy Center, said birth rates in the District have declined since 2016, a possible indicator that fewer students can be expected to enroll in school.

December 1, 2021 | D.C. Policy Center

District Links: DC reaches 200 homicides for first time since 2003; Metrobus to offer all-door boarding next year; and more | The DC Line

A new report from the D.C. Policy Center asks whether mixed-use projects represent downtown’s future. Senior research analyst Bailey McConnell notes that areas replete with mixed-use development have proved more resilient to the economic impact of the pandemic.

November 23, 2021 | D.C. Policy Center

With infrastructure windfall possible, D.C. can avoid mistakes of the past | Washington Informer

In 1867, the federal government purchased a 375-acre site in Anacostia for the settlement of African Americans after the Civil War. In 1941, the government seized a 34-acre section of the community’s land to build Barry Farm Dwellings, a public housing development for African Americans, per a report from the D.C. Policy Center.

November 21, 2021 | D.C. Policy Center

Metro derailment brings transit equity issues to light | StreetSense

Right now, many Black D.C. residents cannot afford to live within walking or biking distance of their workplace.  Data from the D.C. Policy Center found that those who biked to work earned an average of $60,000 a year, while workers who took the bus earned an average of $32,000, the 2017 data found.

November 17, 2021 | D.C. Policy Center

District Links: Council hearing airs stark divisions over encampment pilot; new bill would keep DC’s mail-in ballots and drop boxes; and more | The DC Line

On November 10, 2021, the D.C. Policy Center’s article, D.C. high school alumni reflections on their early career outcomes, was cited by The DC Line: DC Council hears testimony on effectiveness of pilot program on school security [WTOP] ‘Old news? 214-unit development proposed for former Fox 5 site on Wisconsin Avenue’ [UrbanTurf]…

November 10, 2021 | D.C. Policy Center

Oyé Palaver Hut Brings African Culture, Conflict Resolution East of the River | Washington Informer

Earlier this year, the D.C. Policy Center collected data showing that isolation and increased economic hardship during the pandemic further primed young people for socioemotional challenges. In anticipation of months of unresolved trauma spilling into the classroom, Yaa-Anna participated in workshops about trauma-informed instruction.

November 10, 2021 | D.C. Policy Center

D.C. shouldn’t fear losing federal money as it pursues statehood, business-backed group argues | Washington Business Journal

“For most of its history, the District suffered from underinvestment that can, at least in part, be attributed to the lack of stable and proper fiscal supports from the federal government in several fields including education and infrastructure,” researchers with the D.C. Policy Center, which prepared the report alongside Statehood Research, wrote.

October 27, 2021 | D.C. Policy Center

Is anyone safe in DC crosswalks when one dangerous driver per minute passes by? | Greater Greater Washington

Incidents like these continue to occur across DC and are prevalent in every ward. A recent study by the DC Policy Center documented these incidents across the city. It also points out that many of these incidents have not been tracked. Upwards of 30% of incidents involving a pedestrian outside a vehicle that resulted in a 911 call were not actually logged by the Metropolitan Police Department.

October 26, 2021 | D.C. Policy Center

Gentrification Blamed for Food Insecurity in Wards 7, 8 | Washington Informer

The residents located in those areas have limited access to nutritious food, which leads to higher reliance on junk food and fast food, experts say. Additionally, food deserts are usually in low-income areas and communities of color, according to a Department of Agriculture study. Those neighborhoods also often report higher rates of obesity and diabetes, according to a study done by the D.C. Policy Center.

October 26, 2021 | D.C. Policy Center

There’s a new push to incentivize office conversions in downtown D.C. But the idea still faces an uphill climb. | Washington Business Journal

Researchers at the D.C. Policy Center and D.C. Office of Planning have both argued in recent studies that the dearth of conversions often stems from a simple math problem: Even with declining vacancy rates, the shift to residential still may not generate high enough rents to justify the expense of making the switch. Owners of older, class B and C buildings are therefore much more likely to explore the prospect, and even then, owners in the suburbs have more incentive to convert than those in downtown D.C.

October 21, 2021 | D.C. Policy Center

Mayor Bowser Opens Applications for $1.25 Million Inclusive Innovation Equity Impact Fund | EOM

“Over the past couple of years City leadership has propelled the District to be ranked as the #11 startup ecosystem in the world. Moreover, according to the DC Policy Center annual data through Q4 2020 shows there was a 5 percent increase in total private establishments in the District between 2019 and 2020. Now is the time to ensure that the growth of businesses in DC is equitable for all,” said Melissa Bradley

October 20, 2021 | D.C. Policy Center

DC programs connect job seekers and employers during national hiring struggles | StreetSense

“As of June 2021, nearly half the small businesses that operated in January of 2020 were closed, and revenue was down by about 57%,” according to a D.C. Policy Center report commissioned by the D.C. Chamber of Commerce. Those closures were concentrated in “consumer-facing industries” such as leisure and hospitality, where employment remained 35% below February 2020 levels. In contrast, the report found, employment in office-based jobs was only 3% below February 2020 levels.

October 20, 2021 | D.C. Policy Center

Yesim Sayin Taylor named to 2021 Power 100 | Washington Business Journal

How do you understand the effects of a once-in-a-generation pandemic on the local economy? You rely on Yesim Sayin-Taylor, who has spent the last year outlining Covid’s effects on businesses and workers, as well as the District’s own coffers. Her D.C. Policy Center has deepened its partnership with the D.C. Chamber of Commerce to produce regular reports on the region’s economy, while producing more research on topics like D.C. schools, affordable housing and traffic data.

October 18, 2021 | D.C. Policy Center

District Links: Robert White makes his mayoral bid official; new report delves into why DC families leave public schools; and more | The DC Line

“Parents who move their children from D.C. public schools to surrounding jurisdictions cite school quality and housing affordability as major contributing factors to leaving — but what makes a quality school varies widely by household, a new report out today by the D.C. Policy Center found. 

October 13, 2021 | D.C. Policy Center

Why some parents leave D.C. public schools | Axios D.C.

On October 13, 2021, the D.C. Policy Center’s report, Exit & voice: Perceptions of the District’s public schools among stayers and Leavers, was cited by Axios D.C.: Parents who move their children from D.C. public schools to surrounding jurisdictions cite school quality and housing affordability as major contributing factors to leaving —…

October 13, 2021 | D.C. Policy Center

Morning links: Racine declines 2022 run | Axios D.C.

Parents who move their children from D.C. public schools to surrounding jurisdictions cite school quality and housing affordability as major contributing factors to leaving — but what makes a quality school varies widely by household, a new report out today by the D.C. Policy Center found. 

October 13, 2021 | D.C. Policy Center

D.C.’s Extended State Of Emergency Policies Adding Hurdles To Struggling Apartment Market | Bisnow

On October 9, 2021, D.C. Policy Center Executive Director Yesim Sayin Taylor, was quoted by Bisnow: D.C. Policy Center Executive Director Yesim Sayim Taylor said the data shows the vast majority of eviction cases have involved nonpayment of rent.  “Landlords are not happy with the extension of eviction to all causes, they…

October 9, 2021 | D.C. Policy Center

Breakfast links: With dual trails and cyclist rush hours, the W&OD starts to look more like a (car-free) road | Greater Greater Washington

On October 8, 2021, the D.C. Policy Center’s article, Examining office to residential conversions in the District, was cited by Greater Greater Washington: A housing shortage and recent pandemic-driven changes in work patterns mean the District seems to have too much office space, and too little residential. But office to home conversions…

October 8, 2021 | D.C. Policy Center

Less than 25 percent of office workers have returned to downtown D.C., new report says | Washington Post

On October 8, 2021, the D.C. Policy Center’s article, Examining office to residential conversions in the District, was cited by the Washington Post: The D.C. Policy Center came out with its own study Thursday focused on the potential of turning office buildings downtown into residential space. It painted those conversions as an answer to…

October 8, 2021 | D.C. Policy Center

Breakfast links: DC’s pedestrian crash data has a huge missing piece | Greater Greater Washington

On October 7, 2021, the D.C. Policy Center’s article, Observed disparities between 911 calls and crash reports, was cited by Greater Greater Washington: A study by the DC Policy Center found that nearly a third of crashes involving pedestrians, cyclists, and scooter riders go unlogged in DC crash data. Police say they…

October 7, 2021 | D.C. Policy Center

MPD crash data is incomplete, study finds | Axios DC

On October 7, 2021, the D.C. Policy Center’s article, Observed disparities between 911 calls and crash reports, was cited by Axios DC: A third of crashes during a six-week period where a driver hit a cyclist or a pedestrian was not publicly reported by police, a new report by the D.C. Policy Center found….

October 7, 2021 | D.C. Policy Center

District Links: City resumes encampment clearing in NoMa; Supreme Court rejects DC voting rights lawsuit; and more | The DC Line

On October 7, 2021, the D.C. Policy Center’s article, Observed disparities between 911 calls and crash reports, was cited by The DC Line: A new analysis out today from the D.C. Policy Center finds that Metropolitan Police Department’s crash data is incomplete but nonetheless provides the basis for safety decisions by the District Department of Transportation. “While…

October 7, 2021 | D.C. Policy Center

A new accessible medical center opens in Ward 8, DC | StreetSense

On October 6, 2021, the D.C. Policy Center’s article, Pushing through complacency to fight health disparities in D.C.’s African American communities, was cited by StreetSense: Opening the medical center east of the Anacostia River was done strategically, according to Bread for the City’s press release. Access to quality healthcare has been a…

October 6, 2021 | D.C. Policy Center

Study says nearly 1/3 of crashes involving pedestrians and cyclists go unreported in DC | WTOP

On October 6, 2021, the D.C. Policy Center’s article, Observed disparities between 911 calls and crash reports, was cited by WTOP: You wouldn’t necessarily expect every single car accident to get a police report after the fact, even if an ambulance is sent out to respond to the scene as a precaution….

October 6, 2021 | D.C. Policy Center

The Pandemic Hit Cities Hard, but Especially Washington, D.C. | Wall Street Journal

On September 27, 2021, the D.C. Policy Center’s article, Births and international in-migration maintain the District’s population 15-year population growth, was cited by the Wall Street Journal: People are pushing farther out. Stafford and Loudoun counties in Virginia and Frederick County in Maryland saw the strongest area population growth rates, almost 2%, as well…

September 27, 2021 | D.C. Policy Center

11 charter schools in DC will give admissions preference to at-risk students | WTOP

On September 18, 2021, the D.C. Policy Center Education Policy Initiative Director Chelsea Coffin was cited by WTOP: During a public hearing in July 2020, before the law was passed, Chelsea Coffin, the director of the Education Initiative of D.C. Policy Center, testified before the city council on the report the center published on…

September 18, 2021 | D.C. Policy Center

Eleven D.C. Charter Schools To Give Admissions Preference To At-Risk Students | DCist

On September 17, 2021, the D.C. Policy Center’s report, At-risk priority in D.C.’s common lottery: Potential implications for access and diversity, was cited by DCist: In an analysis published last year, the D.C. Policy Center determined that a new at-risk preference would likely accomplish those goals. “Implementing a priority for at-risk applicants…

September 17, 2021 | D.C. Policy Center

How The Rise Of Post-9/11 Defense Contracting Helped Reshape Local Neighborhoods | DCist

On September 10, 2021, the D.C. Policy Center’s article, How big of a deal is Amazon HQ2 for the DC Metro Region?, was cited by DCist: Economist Yesim Sayin Taylor with the D.C. Policy Center wrote in a 2018 paper that Amazon would likely be “an unimpressive flare in the region’s chronic housing crisis,”…

September 10, 2021 | D.C. Policy Center

Friendship PCS Blow Pierce Campus Maintains Ties with Parents During In-Person Learning | Washington Informer

On September 8, 2021, D.C. Policy Center’s article, Challenges outside of school for D.C.’s students and families during the pandemic, was cited by the Washington Informer: A report published by the D.C. Policy Center in March found that District children who stayed home during the pandemic experienced social isolation, anxiety and depression. As adults…

September 8, 2021 | D.C. Policy Center

Washington, D.C. Is Planning an Unnecessary and Harmful Wealth Tax | Citizens Against Government Waste

On August 25, 2021, the D.C. Policy Center’s article, The long view for the District’s budget: What is awaiting the District in Fiscal Year 2022 and beyond, was quoted by Citizens Against Government Waste: Both policy analysts on the right and left agree that the city has enough money and will continue…

August 25, 2021 | D.C. Policy Center

Temperatures in D.C.’s Heat Islands, Can Register Ten to Twenty Degrees Hotter Than in Leafy Neighborhoods | Washington City Paper

On August 19, 2021, the D.C. Policy Center’s article, Discriminatory housing practices in the District: A brief history by Kathryn Zickuhr, was cited by Washington City Paper: “[G]overnment regulations and recommendations at every level of government sought to keep Black and white residents separated, subsidizing construction, loans, and housing for white residents…

August 19, 2021 | D.C. Policy Center

Goodbye, Chocolate City | Washington Post

On August 14, 2021, the D.C. Policy Center’s article, How the region’s racial and ethnic demographics have changed since 1970, was cited by the Washington Post: White people, who didn’t face labor market discrimination or the legacy of slavery, got there first. But plenty of Black people wanted houses with yards and…

August 14, 2021 | D.C. Policy Center

Property Taxes And Pot In Col., VAT In Texas: SALT In Review | Law360

On August 13, 2021, the D.C. Policy Center’s article, What is happening to the District’s personal income tax base?, was cited by Law360: The D.C. Policy Center is among the most influential think tanks in the nation’s capital. The center conducts excellent research and analysis on a wide variety of public policy…

August 13, 2021 | D.C. Policy Center

How rising property taxes are disproportionately impacting low-income, gentrified neighborhoods | WUSA9

On August 13, 2021, the D.C. Policy Center’s article, The rise and demise of racially restrictive covenants in Bloomingdale, was cited by WUSA9: Much of what shaped these Black neighborhoods was the result of racially restrictive covenants throughout the mid-20th century that banned Black people from buying property in White neighborhoods forcing…

August 13, 2021 | D.C. Policy Center

Developer duo tackles mixed-use project from the ground up in Deanwood | Washington Business Journal

On August 6, 2021, the D.C. Policy Center’s article, Food access in D.C is deeply connected to poverty and transportation, was cited by the Washington Business Journal: The grocery store is a necessity for her neighbors, too. The D.C. Policy Center, a research group launched years ago by the Federal City Council,…

August 6, 2021 | D.C. Policy Center

D.C. statehood could cost more than $1 billion. City officials aren’t fazed. | Washington Post

On June 4, 2021, D.C. Policy Center Executive Director Dr. Yesim Sayin Taylor, was quoted by The Washington Post: Some analysts said statehood could bring other financial opportunities as well. If the District had voting representation in Congress, lawmakers could lobby more effectively for federal grant funding available to all states, said…

June 4, 2021 | D.C. Policy Center

This bill would create a new tool for DC to expand its dedicated affordable housing stock | Greater Greater Washington

On June 1, 2021, the D.C. Policy Center was mentioned by Greater Greater Washington: There’s no cost estimate yet for the program, but White expects cost estimates to be “very compelling.” He said they are working with the DC Policy Center to estimate how much funding the program would need and how…

June 1, 2021 | D.C. Policy Center

He was denied an SBA grant. But the gated community nearby would qualify. | Triad Business Journal

On May 21, 2021, D.C. Policy Center Executive Director Dr. Yesim Sayin Taylor was quoted by the Triad Business Journal: But that can cause issues, according to Yesim Taylor, head of the D.C. Policy Center, who noted that these maps are based off census tracts. Read more: He was denied an SBA…

May 21, 2021 | D.C. Policy Center

Report: While hundreds of businesses closed their doors due to COVID, new businesses were being formed | WUSA9

On May 5, 2021, D.C. Policy Center Executive Director Yesim Sayin Taylor, was quoted by WUSA9: The D.C. Policy Center, a think-tank nonprofit, said hundreds of people like Bryan decided to open small, home-based businesses during the pandemic. In its 2020 report, it found that as hundreds of businesses were being wiped…

May 5, 2021 | D.C. Policy Center

Voices Of Wards 7 And 8: Violence In The Community | DCist

On May 3, 2021, the D.C. Policy Center’s article, Goodbye to Chocolate City, was cited by DCist: D.C. went by several names in the second half of the 20th century: Chocolate City for example, referred to the fact that D.C. was the country’s first majority Black city. While more white residents now call the…

May 3, 2021 | D.C. Policy Center

‘D.C.’s richest residents pay lower taxes than everyone else,’ report finds | StreetSense

On April 29, 2021, the D.C. Policy Center’s article, Tax practices that amplify racial inequities: Property tax treatment of owner-occupied housing, was cited by StreetSense: A 2018 report by the D.C. Policy Center stated that provisions such as the homestead deduction and property tax cap, which give large tax breaks to homeowners in gentrified…

April 29, 2021 | D.C. Policy Center

How Cleveland Park’s historic district cost the neighborhood 42 homes in one project | Greater Greater Washington

On April 29, 2021, the D.C. Policy Center’s article, The District’s population grows for the 14th year in a row, but at a weaker rate, was cited by Greater Greater Washington: The city’s population has grown over the last two decades, and is likely to continue to do so. Even if COVID…

April 29, 2021 | D.C. Policy Center

D.C.’s explosive growth continued over the past decade, census data shows | Washington Post

On April 26, 2021, D.C. Policy Center researcher Sunaina Kathpalia was quoted by the Washington Post: Sunaina Kathpalia, a demographics researcher at the D.C. Policy Center, said that the slowed population growth in the latter half of the decade is “not a sign of some kind of doom.” “It is part of…

April 27, 2021 | D.C. Policy Center

How DC can reduce traffic deaths and make real progress on Vision Zero | Greater Greater Washington

On April 22, 2021, the D.C. Policy Center’s article, Where it’s easiest to live car-free in D.C., was cited by Greater Greater Washington: The goals of safety and equity in transportation are aligned. Private vehicles are the most deadly form of transportation. The DC Policy Center has shown that areas where car-free living is…

April 22, 2021 | D.C. Policy Center

How difficult will it be to make buildings in DC more energy efficient? It depends on the building. | Greater Greater Washington

On April 19, 2021, the D.C. Policy Center’s report, Taking Stock of the District’s Housing Stock, was cited by Greater Greater Washington: Multifamily affordable housing units are more difficult to find, as only 31% of the available housing units in the District were “potentially” affordable to families of four, according to a 2018 report…

April 19, 2021 | D.C. Policy Center

The Miles to the Grocery Store Got Longer This Year | Slate

On April 9, 2021, the D.C. Policy Center’s article, Food access in D.C is deeply connected to poverty and transportation, was cited by Slate: Researchers define a food desert in D.C. as an area where there is no full-service grocery store within a half-mile and where 40 percent of the households don’t have a…

April 9, 2021 | D.C. Policy Center
Media | Uncategorized

‘School Wasn’t Even Important’: For Many Local Students, The Pandemic Has Meant A Mountain Of Adult Responsibilities | WAMU

On March 9, 2021, D.C. Policy Center Wilkes Scholar Yanesia Norris was quoted and cited by WAMU: Students who live in Ward 7 and 8, majority-Black parts of the city with large concentrations of low-income families and high numbers of frontline workers, are at higher risk of contracting the coronavirus, according to an…

March 9, 2021 | D.C. Policy Center

Progressive Lawmakers Are Considering Raising Taxes On The Rich. Should They? | DCist

On March 2, 2021, D.C. Policy Center Executive Director Dr. Yesim Sayin Taylor, was quoted by DCist: Yesim Sayin Taylor, the director of the D.C. Policy Center, another local think tank, says she understands the desire to identify new sources of revenue for social programs, calling the issues raised by Allen “terribly…

March 2, 2021 | D.C. Policy Center

RESIDENCE RESISTANCE: Zoning remains at the crux, while real estate firms tackle the need with new aid | Washington Business Journal

On February 26, 2021, D.C Policy Center Executive Director Dr. Yesim Sayin Taylor was quoted by the Washington Business Journal: The benefits of homeownership reverberate well past a domicile’s four walls. It doesn’t just produce wealth for current owners — it snowballs over time for future generations. It creates a pipeline for…

February 26, 2021 | D.C. Policy Center

D.C.’s Mayor Mourned Covid’s Unequal Toll. Her Sister Is the Latest Victim. | New York Times

On February 25, 2021, D.C. Policy Center Executive Director Dr. Yesim Sayin Taylor was quoted by the New York Times: Even if the disease strikes the overall population somewhat evenly, the risks of death are far less uniform, said Yesim Sayin Taylor, the executive director of the D.C. Policy Center, a research…

February 25, 2021 | D.C. Policy Center

An amendment 4 years in the making, with massive implications for affordable housing in DC, to be voted on in March | StreetSense Media

On February 24, 2021, the D.C. Policy Center’s article, A decade of demographic change in D.C.: Which neighborhoods have changed the most?, was cited by StreetSense: Public worries about the plan’s focus and intentions stem from the negative effects of gentrification and Black and brown displacement in the city, particularly in the…

February 24, 2021 | D.C. Policy Center

District Links: CFO Jeff DeWitt departing DC | The DC Line

On February 17, 2021, Executive Director Yesim Sayin Taylor’s interview with Washingtonian was cited by the DC Line: ► DC BUDGET – ‘DC has a surprise $552 million budget surplus despite Covid. What gives?’ Washingtonian’s Luke Mullins: “Though the covid pandemic has hammered the Washington region’s economy, the DC government finished its 2020 fiscal year…

February 18, 2021 | D.C. Policy Center
Media | Uncategorized

Who could be D.C.’s next CFO? DeWitt’s departure sets stage for debate over city’s finances. | Washington Business Journal

On February 18, 2021, D.C. Policy Center Executive Director Yesim Sayin Taylor was quoted by the Washington Business Journal: Yesim Taylor, head of the D.C. Policy Center and before that a longtime staffer in the CFO’s office, believes Mendelson’s assessment is accurate, if for no other reason than the job is an…

February 18, 2021 | D.C. Policy Center

D.C. Faces A Startling Question: What If Office Workers Don’t Come Back? | DCist

On February 16, 2021, the D.C. Policy Center’s report, 2020 State of Business: Pivoting from Pandemic to Recovery was cited by DCist: The D.C. Policy Center, which is run by Yesim Taylor, a former staffer in the CFO’s office, summarized the risk to D.C. as follows in its 2020 State of Business Report:…

February 16, 2021 | D.C. Policy Center

DC Has a Surprise $552 Million Budget Surplus Despite Covid. What Gives? | Washingtonian

On February 16, 2021, D.C. Policy Center Executive Director Yesim Sayin Taylor was quoted by Washingtonian: Though the covid pandemic has hammered the Washington region’s economy, the DC government finished its 2020 fiscal year with a surplus of more than half a billion dollars. How is that possible? What does it say about about…

February 16, 2021 | D.C. Policy Center

The pandemic hasn’t devastated local budgets in the D.C. area, but risks remain | Washington Business Journal

On February 4, 2021, D.C. Policy Center Executive Director Yesim Sayin Taylor was quoted by the Washington Business Journal: Yesim Taylor, executive director of the D.C. Policy Center and a former staffer in the CFO’s office, observed that the typical formula for appraisers involves examining a building’s capitalization rate: essentially, the ratio…

February 4, 2021 | D.C. Policy Center

Insulated, Not Immune | Washington Business Journal

On February 4, 2021, D.C. Policy Center Executive Director Yesim Sayin Taylor was quoted by the Washington Business Journal: Yesim Taylor, executive director of the D.C. Policy Center and a former staffer in the CFO’s office, observed that the typical formula for appraisers involves examining a building’s capitalization rate: essentially, the ratio…

February 4, 2021 | D.C. Policy Center

A potential inauguration threat showcased America’s housing crisis | Vox

On January 19, 2021, the D.C. Policy Center’s article, Single-family zoning and neighborhood characteristics in the District of Columbia, was cited by Vox: Limited supply means greater competition for the housing that is available, and that competition benefits higher- and middle-income people. And local zoning regulations, which make it more difficult for…

January 19, 2021 | D.C. Policy Center

After pandemic, inauguration was ‘make-or-break’ moment. But small businesses in D.C. fear the worst. | NBC

On January 19, 2021, the D.C. Policy Center’s report, 2020 State of Business Report: Pivoting from Pandemic to Recovery, was cited by NBC: The city has been hammered by political unrest over the last year as the pandemic closed stores and prohibited indoor dining, gutting some businesses. More than one-quarter of small…

January 19, 2021 | D.C. Policy Center

D.C. Statehood Is More Urgent Than Ever | The Atlantic

On January 9, 2021, the D.C. Policy Center’s article, Goodbye to Chocolate City, was cited by The Atlantic: Though the rapidly gentrifying District is now 46 percent Black and 46 percent white, many still see it as “Chocolate City.” Scaling back democratic protections for Black people has been a hallmark of this administration and…

January 9, 2021 | D.C. Policy Center

As D.C. Activists Push To Expand Rent Control, A Tool To Keep Track Of It Has Been Delayed For Years | DCist

On December 21, 2020, the D.C. Policy Center’s policy brief, How would the “Reclaim Rent Control” proposals change the District’s rental housing landscape?, was cited by DCist: In 2011, a study by the Urban Institute found that 79,145 units across 4,818 properties in D.C. were “potentially subject to rent control.” At a recent…

December 21, 2020 | D.C. Policy Center

D.C. Council Passes Bill Lowering Barriers To Employment For Residents With Criminal Records | DCist

On December 18, 2020, the D.C. Policy Center’s article, The impact of occupational licensing requirements in D.C., was cited by DCist: Earlier this year, the District’s protections for criminal-record-holding citizens seeking occupational licenses received a C- grade in a nationwide report on licensing barriers from the Institute for Justice. According to a 2019 D.C. Policy Center…

December 18, 2020 | D.C. Policy Center

Spike in new business formations signals post-Covid optimism, experts say | Washington Business Journal

On December 14, 2020, D.C. Policy Center executive director Yesim Sayin Taylor was quoted by Washington Business Journal: Yesim Taylor, executive director of the D.C. Policy Center, said the trend in new business applications is the same nationwide, with a dramatic increase in the third quarter. But the D.C., Virginia and Maryland…

December 14, 2020 | D.C. Policy Center

LTE: Nearly one half of small businesses closed in Washington, D.C. due to COVID-19 | Washington Times

On December 2, 2020, the D.C. Policy Center’s article, How COVID-19 is affecting small businesses in D.C., was referenced in a letter-to-the-editor in the Washington Times: It is small business owners, especially, that do not have the resources or means to perpetually stay open in the midst of lockdowns. In D.C., this…

December 2, 2020 | D.C. Policy Center
Media | Uncategorized

District Line Daily: Derailed | Washington City Paper

On December 1, 2020, the D.C. Policy Center’s article, New D.C. education data show how school choice plays out across wards, was cited by Washington City Paper: The cuts would come when there is a vaccine. (Dr. Moncef Slaoui, the chief scientific adviser for Operation Warp Speed, tells CNN it’s possible we reach herd immunity…

December 1, 2020 | D.C. Policy Center

Metro’s Proposed Cuts Are A ‘Punch In The Gut’ For Workers And The Local Economy | DCist

On December 1, 2020, D.C. Policy Center Executive Director Yesim Sayin Taylor, was quoted by DCist: And while the pain will be felt across the Washington region, Yesim Sayin Taylor of the D.C. Policy Center says the District will feel it particularly acutely. D.C. has already seen its revenue depleted by hundreds…

December 1, 2020 | D.C. Policy Center

Omnibus legislation gets hearing with sharp divide between tenant advocates and housing providers | Street Sense

On November 23, 2020, the D.C. Policy Center’s policy brief, How would the “Reclaim Rent Control” proposals change the District’s rental housing landscape?, was cited by Street Sense: Yesim Sayin Taylor, executive director of the D.C. Policy Center, said that “there are currently 72,900 rent-controlled units in the District and if the Council enacts…

November 23, 2020 | D.C. Policy Center

D.C. Nonprofits, Already Strained, Are Bracing For Less Bountiful Holiday Season | DCist

On November 19, 2020, the D.C. Policy Center’s article, How COVID-19 is affecting nonprofits in the D.C. area, was cited by DCist: Before the pandemic, Rebuilding Together relied largely on volunteers — more than 1,000 each year — to do basic home repairs like fixing smoke alarms and installing safety grab bars…

November 19, 2020 | D.C. Policy Center

District Links: Another deal to return teachers to classrooms falls apart… | The DC Line

On November 18, 2020, the D.C. Policy Center’s report, At-risk application patterns in D.C.’s common lottery, was cited by The DC Line: Families of at-risk students are less likely to participate in the school lottery and submit applications prior to the deadline, a new report from the D.C. Policy Center found. Even so, author Chelsea Coffin says, there…

November 18, 2020 | D.C. Policy Center

‘Keep the rent reasonable so I can pay it’ | DC tenants ask Council to strengthen rent control law | WUSA9

On November 9, 2020, the D.C. Policy Center’s report, How would the “Reclaim Rent Control” proposals change the District’s rental housing landscape?, was cited by WUSA9: According to the DC Policy Center, roughly 36% of the District’s rental units are rent controlled, which amounts to around 75,000 rent-controlled apartments in D.C. But laws…

November 12, 2020 | D.C. Policy Center

A Proposal To Expand Rent Control In D.C. Gets A Contentious Hearing | DCist

On November 10, 2020, the D.C. Policy Center’s report, How would the “Reclaim Rent Control” proposals change the District’s rental housing landscape?, was cited by DCist: If the bill passes, it would immediately subject more than 13,000 housing units to rent stabilization, most in small buildings, according to a new report from the…

November 10, 2020 | D.C. Policy Center

District Line Daily: “Reclaim Rent Control” Gets A Hearing | Washington City Paper

On November 9, 2020, the D.C. Policy Center’s policy brief, How would the “Reclaim Rent Control” proposals change the District’s rental housing landscape?, was cited by Washington City Paper: The D.C. Policy Center, a business-backed think tank, released a lengthy report on the bill ahead of hearing that could spook some councilmembers. The report…

November 9, 2020 | D.C. Policy Center

District Links: DCPS cancels plans for in-person instruction for some students next week; 95 voting centers open for Election Day; and more | The DC Line

On November 3, 2020, the D.C. Policy Center’s article, COVID-era health care workforce capacity in Washington, D.C., was cited by The DC Line: A new report from the D.C. Policy Center examines the District’s COIVD-era health care workforce, including the geographic distribution of physicians, nurses, respiratory therapists and other health providers in the District. In…

November 3, 2020 | D.C. Policy Center

D.C. Food Banks and Nonprofits Face Dueling Crises During the Holidays | Washington City Paper

On November 3, 2020, the D.C. Policy Center’s article, Food access in D.C is deeply connected to poverty and transportation, was cited by Washington City Paper: Food insecurity in the District long predates the pandemic. In 2019, 10.6 percent of adults and 19.3 percent of children were food insecure, and according to…

November 3, 2020 | D.C. Policy Center

Economic aftershocks: Even after the pandemic ends, its effects will linger across the D.C. region | Washington Business Journal

On October 30, 2020, D.C. Policy Center Executive Director Yesim Sayin Taylor, was quoted by the Washington Business Journal: “We see this especially in D.C.,” said Yesim Sayin Taylor, executive director of the D.C. Policy Center, a business-focused research and policy group, regarding the pandemic’s disproportionate blows to lower-paid workers. “The impacts…

October 30, 2020 | D.C. Policy Center

Small Landlords In D.C. Worry Pandemic Will Force Them To Sell Their Property | DCist

On October 27, 2020, the D.C. Policy Center’s report, Appraising the District’s rentals, was cited by DCist: Large, professionally managed apartment buildings are the most visible source of the city’s rental housing. But in the District, one third of rental stock exists in what’s called the “shadow” rental market, according to the…

October 27, 2020 | D.C. Policy Center
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D.C.’s Extended State Of Emergency Policies Adding Hurdles To Struggling Apartment Market | BisNow

On October 9, 2020, D.C. Policy Center Executive Director Yesim Sayin Taylor was quoted by BisNow: D.C. Policy Center Executive Director Yesim Sayim Taylor said the data shows the vast majority of eviction cases have involved nonpayment of rent.  “Landlords are not happy with the extension of eviction to all causes, they…

October 9, 2020 | D.C. Policy Center
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D.C.’s speed camera revenue has dropped significantly as a result of Covid-19 | Washington Business Journal

On October 7, 2020, the D.C. Policy Center’s Executive Director, Yesim Sayin Taylor, was quoted by the Washington Business Journal: That most likely reflects the District’s assumptions about how long it will take for some people to return to work at their traditional offices, said Yesim Taylor, executive director at the D.C….

October 7, 2020 | D.C. Policy Center
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PPP Money Abounded—but Some Got It Faster Than Others | Wall Street Journal

On October 6, 2020, the D.C. Policy Center’s Executive Director, Yesim Sayin Taylor, was quoted by the Wall Street Journal: Already, the unemployment rate in Washington’s Wards 7 and 8, the areas east of the Anacostia, surged to 14.2% and 18.4% in August, respectively, compared with 9.3% and 12.5% a year earlier, according to D.C. government data. In Ward 2, which includes the city’s central business district, the August jobless rate was 4.7%, compared with 3.8% a year earlier. “I’m very concerned about businesses closing,“ said Yesim Sayin Taylor, founding executive…

October 6, 2020 | D.C. Policy Center
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A lack of commuters is crippling D.C.’s economy. So the D.C. Chamber is focusing on how to bring people back | Washington Business Journal

On October 2, 2020, the D.C. Policy Center’s 2020 State of Business Report: Pivoting from Pandemic to Recovery, was cited by the Washington Business Journal: While every part of the region has been touched by the crisis, the chamber’s annual “State of Business” report documented especially dire effects in D.C. driven by…

October 2, 2020 | D.C. Policy Center
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Pandemic hit less than feared in 2020, but will hurt D.C. budget next year more than originally forecast | Washington Post

On September 30, 2020, D.C. Policy Center Executive Director Yesim Sayin Taylor was quoted by the Washington Post: At the more moderate D.C. Policy Center, executive director Yesim Taylor argued for across-the-board cuts that would reduce each agency’s budget by perhaps 2.5 percent, rather than tax increases. “The benefit of cutting spending…

September 30, 2020 | D.C. Policy Center
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District Links: New bleak revenue projections to force budget changes | The DC Line

On September 30, 2020, D.C. Policy Center Executive Director Yesim Sayin Taylor was quoted by the DC Line: The new projections will force changes to the 2021 budget, either in the form of spending cuts or revenue increases. Although the surplus for 2020 is roughly equivalent to the newly identified revenue shortfall…

September 30, 2020 | D.C. Policy Center
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As Many Public Schools Fight to Retain Students Amid Pandemic, Washington, D.C.’s Charters Are Closer to Meeting Fall Enrollment Projections Than DCPS’s Traditional Schools | The 74 Million

On September 27, 2020, the Director of the D.C. Policy Center’s Education Policy Initiative, Chelsea Coffin, was quoted by The 74 Million: “It’s critical to find out who those students might be,“ said Chelsea Coffin, director of the Education Policy Initiative at the D.C. Policy Center, who has studied enrollment trends in the…

September 27, 2020 | D.C. Policy Center
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If D.C. expands rent control, impacted landlords could win huge tax breaks. That’s alarming lawmakers. | Washington Business Journal

On September 23, 2020, the D.C. Policy Center’s article, Roughly 36 percent of D.C.’s rental housing units are rent-stabilized, was cited by the Washington Business Journal: The District hasn’t updated its rent control law in 35 years. It currently covers most apartments built before 1975 – about 75,000 units, or 36% of all units…

September 23, 2020 | D.C. Policy Center
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Advocates Make Final Push To Involve Hard-To-Count D.C. Areas In The Census | WAMU

On September 22, 2020, the D.C. Policy Center’s article, D.C. is hard to count. Here’s where officials could target efforts for the 2020 Census, was cited by WAMU: D.C. Policy Center fellow Mike Maciag says D.C. has some specific challenges. “In D.C., we have a very transient population,” Maciag says. “Members of the military,…

September 22, 2020 | D.C. Policy Center
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Giving At-Risk Kids Priority in Lottery for D.C. Charter Schools Can Help Integration and Right a Historic Wrong | The 74 Million

On September 21, 2020, the D.C. Policy Center’s report, At-risk priority in D.C.’s common lottery, was cited in The 74 Million: These measures work. As noted by the D.C. Policy Center, at-risk students tend to be excluded from schools already serving lower percentages of such children, largely because existing preferences in D.C.’s common lottery…

September 21, 2020 | D.C. Policy Center
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How has privatization of public housing fared in DC? | Greater Greater Washington

On September 4, 2020, the D.C. Policy Center’s publication, The history and evolution of Anacostia’s Barry Farm, was cited by Greater Greater Washington: For example, two miles from Greenleaf Gardens, the historic Barry Farms is in the 14th year since NCI redevelopment was approved. Although residents were eventually able to assert their rights and…

September 4, 2020 | D.C. Policy Center
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District Links: DC residents can’t register to vote online anymore; COVID-19 cases dip in area; and more | The DC Line

On August 19, 2020, the D.C. Policy Center’s article, Paycheck Protection Program in the District: Hard-hit industries receive a smaller share of loans, was cited by The DC Line: ► REPORT – ‘Paycheck Protection Program in the District: Hard-hit industries receive a smaller share of loans.’ DC Policy Center’s Sunaina Kathpalia and Yesim Sayin Taylor: “Establishments with 20-49…

August 25, 2020 | D.C. Policy Center
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D.C.’s mayor and council agree on one thing: Local businesses need help | Washington Post

On August 21, 2020, the D.C. Policy Center’s article, How COVID-19 is affecting small businesses in D.C., was cited in an opinion piece in the Washington Post: As a local business owner who has lived and worked in the D.C. area for 35 years, I’ve seen the incredible growth of this city. Local…

August 21, 2020 | D.C. Policy Center
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DC Mayor Bowser dismisses Tucker Carlson comments: ‘People aren’t leaving DC in droves’ | The Hill

On August 20, 2020, the D.C. Policy Center’s article, The District’s population grows for the 14th year in a row, but at a weaker rate, was cited by The Hill: The most recent census numbers put D.C.’s population at 705,749 as of July 1, 2019, up 4,202 people from 2018. This equates to a growth rate of 0.6…

August 20, 2020 | D.C. Policy Center
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The Urban Trail: It’s time to use zoning, regulatory tools to create more equitable neighborhoods | Washington Business Journal

On August 20, 2020, the D.C. Policy Center’s work and map were cited by the Washington Business Journal: While many today are not aware of the racist roots of these policies, and would strongly oppose perpetuating racial inequity, the results are hard to argue: Our region and many others remain as segregated…

August 20, 2020 | D.C. Policy Center
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Opinion: UDC is focused on the wrong students | Forest Hills Connection

On August 12, 2020, the D.C. Policy Center’s article, State of D.C. Schools 2018-19, was cited by Forest Hills Connection: In 2018, as UDC was rolling out its four-year strategic plan, 3,359 students graduated from DC public schools and charter schools. According to the DC Policy Center, 56% of those students went on to pursue…

August 12, 2020 | D.C. Policy Center
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DC driving citations spike during the early stages of COVID-19 | Greater Greater Washington

On August 5, 2020, the D.C. Policy Center’s article, Speed cameras in D.C., was cited by Greater Greater Washington: By looking at the locations where most violations occurred, it’s clear that DC drivers’ habits began changing in March. The most frequent location of moving violation citations in February through April 2019, as…

August 5, 2020 | D.C. Policy Center
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Let’s show Black lives matter in education | The DC Line

On August 5, 2020, the D.C. Policy Center’s article, Student achievement is on the rise, but critical gaps persist, was cited by The DC Line: After a quarter-century of education reform in the District — including a 1995 law authorizing public charter schools as well as mayoral control of the city-run school…

August 5, 2020 | D.C. Policy Center
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D.C. debates whether low-income students should get preference in the school lottery system | Washington Post

On August 4, 2020, the D.C. Policy Center’s article, At-risk priority in D.C.’s common lottery: Potential implications for access and diversity, was cited by the Washington Post: The D.C. Policy Center, a local think tank, released a study last month examining the impact that adding an at-risk preference would have on lottery results. The…

August 4, 2020 | D.C. Policy Center
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Six big obstacles to economic recovery, from child-care shortages to displaced workers | Washington Post

On July 20, 2020, D.C. Policy Center Executive Director Yesim Sayin Taylor, was quoted in the Washington Post: Meanwhile, day-care centers are losing slots or going under. Few have enough space to serve as many children as in the past, given the need for physical distancing. Many can’t afford to reopen. “Their financial…

July 20, 2020 | D.C. Policy Center
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Map of the Week: D.C. Food Deserts | American Geographical Society

On July 16, 2020, the D.C. Policy Center’s article, Food access in D.C is deeply connected to poverty and transportation, was cited by the American Geographical Society: In Washington D.C., food insecurity is no new phenomenon. D.C. is broken down into eight wards, shown on the map to the right. D.C. Policy Center…

July 16, 2020 | D.C. Policy Center
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District Links: Coronavirus cases rise in DC and region; Bowser plugs statehood on Tax Day; and more | The DC Line

On July 15, 2020, the D.C. Policy Center’s article, D.C. Voices: Sustainability of D.C. child care facilities during the pandemic, was cited by The DC Line: Amid concerns about the state of the child care sector now and in the future, the D.C. Policy Center’s Chelsea Coffin and Amanda Chu write that pandemic-related financial…

July 15, 2020 | D.C. Policy Center
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What we’re reading: D.C. Voices: Teacher retention and recruitment during the pandemic | National Council on Teacher Quality

On July 14, 2020, the D.C. Policy Center’s article, D.C. Voices: Teacher retention and recruitment during the pandemic, was featured on the blog of the National Council on Teacher Quality: The COVID-19 pandemic has introduced new challenges to retaining teachers and the traditional teacher hiring process. New analysis from Chelsea Coffin and Tanaz…

July 14, 2020 | D.C. Policy Center
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Letter: Here are some reasons for DC statehood | Chico Enterprise-Record

On July 12, 2020, the D.C. Policy Center’s work was cited in the Chico Enterprise-Record: If DC were a state this would lead to the Federal government being “coerced” by being part of a state. In fact, the vast majority of DC residents do not work for the federal government: according to…

July 12, 2020 | D.C. Policy Center
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Why Black activists are fighting for D.C. statehood | Mashable

On July 3, 2020, the D.C. Policy Center’s article, D.C. is hard to count. Here’s where officials could target efforts for the 2020 Census, was cited by Mashable: D.C. is “becoming more and more white… It’s pretty hard to see race as a factor in the denial [of statehood]. I think it’s…

July 3, 2020 | D.C. Policy Center
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Timeline of COVID-19 policies, cases, and deaths in your state | Johns Hopkins Coronavirus Resource Center

In summer 2020, the D.C. Policy Center article A timeline of the D.C. region’s COVID-19 pandemic was cited by the Johns Hopkins Coronavirus Resource Center. Read more: Timeline of COVID-19 policies, cases, and deaths in your state | Johns Hopkins Coronavirus Resource Center Related: A timeline of the D.C. region’s COVID-19 pandemic…

July 2, 2020 | D.C. Policy Center
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Let’s Talk About Urban Heat Island Effect | Casey Trees

On June 22, 2020, the D.C. Policy Center’s article, D.C.’s heat islands, was cited by Casey Trees: In 2017 the D.C. Policy Center published a report that added more detail to how heat affects Washington residents. It overlaid temperature with social, economic and health-related factors, as well as vegetation variability, to yield what is…

June 22, 2020 | D.C. Policy Center
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What happened to Chocolate City? Gentrification. | Washington Post

On June 19, 2020, the D.C. Policy Center’s article, Goodbye to Chocolate City, was cited in an opinion piece at the Washington Post:  In 1970, our city was more than 70 percent African American, but what became of Chocolate City? In 2015, the city dropped to below 50 percent African American. It is conservatively estimated that…

June 19, 2020 | D.C. Policy Center
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Op-Ed: Transportation and the Police: Reconsidering Traffic Enforcement | Eno Center for Transportation

On June 11, 2020, the D.C. Policy Center’s article, Predominately black neighborhoods in D.C. bear the brunt of automated traffic enforcement, was cited in an op-ed at the Eno Center for Transportation: While Washington, D.C. relies heavily on automated traffic enforcement cameras, a report by the DC Policy Center found that drivers in predominantly…

June 11, 2020 | D.C. Policy Center
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District Links: Schools chancellor defends cops in schools; Bowser lands late-night TV gigs; Norton bill labels mayor as ‘governor’; and more | The DC Line

On June 11, 2020, the D.C. Policy Center’s article, ARTICLE, was cited by The DC Line: A new publication from the D.C. Policy Center explores how school facilities and operations will need to adapt for DC schools to reopen. Authors Tanaz Meghjani and Chelsea Coffin posed a key question to several school leaders: “What is top of mind for you in…

June 11, 2020 | D.C. Policy Center
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We Don’t Need Cops to Enforce Traffic Laws | Vice

On June 11, 2020, the D.C. Policy Center’s article, Predominately black neighborhoods in D.C. bear the brunt of automated traffic enforcement, was cited by Vice: Speed and red light cameras are a proven, functional technology that make roads safer by slowing drivers down. They’re widely used in other countries and can also enforce parking…

June 11, 2020 | D.C. Policy Center
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Here’s What Black Lives Matter D.C. Is Calling For, And Where The City Stands | NPR

On June 9, 2020, the D.C. Policy Center’s article, Implementing the NEAR Act to reduce violence in D.C., was cited by NPR: Ward 5 Councilmember Kenyan McDuffie thinks there’s a middle ground. “I want community policing in my neighborhood, but I do not and do not condone over-policing in any neighborhood, particularly…

June 9, 2020 | D.C. Policy Center
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D.C. Public Schools Chancellor Lewis Ferebee Talks COVID-19 Recovery Plans, With an Eye Toward Returning to In-Person Instruction | The 74 Million

On June 7, 2020, the D.C. Policy Center’s article, D.C. Voices: Mental health supports during school closures, was cited by The 74 Million: And that’s just one part of the equation. As with many districts nationwide, DCPS is still determining the best way to “creatively assess” students as the new academic year…

June 7, 2020 | D.C. Policy Center
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From the White House to the Lincoln Memorial, Thousands March for Black Lives | Courthouse News Service

On June 7 , 2020, the D.C. Policy Center’s article, What is the impact of fare evasion in D.C.?, was cited by Courthouse News Service: According to the D.C. Policy Center, the Washington Metropolitan Area Transit Authority expanded funding for fare enforcement in recent years though the D.C. council only recently decriminalized fare evasion….

June 7, 2020 | D.C. Policy Center
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D.C. Schools Avoided the Draconian Budget Cuts Many U.S. Districts Are Facing: How the City Did It — and What Advocates Say Still Needs to Be Done | The 74 Million

On May 27, 2020, the D.C. Policy Center’s Education Policy Initiative Director Chelsea Coffin was cited by The 74 Million: These students’ “lived experience are going to look quite different in the coming months, perhaps from income shock or doubling up on housing, stress in the household, and other ways,” said Chelsea…

May 27, 2020 | D.C. Policy Center
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As a Federal Coronavirus Expert Frets, the Capital Moves to Reopen | New York Times

On May 27, 2020, D.C. Policy Center Executive Director Yesim Sayin Taylor was quoted by the New York Times: “I would add to the resource issue the black population’s historically complex relationship with health care,” said Yesim Sayin Taylor, the executive director of the D.C. Policy Center, a research organization. Ward 8 has…

May 27, 2020 | D.C. Policy Center
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D.C. Schools Avoided the Draconian Budget Cuts Many U.S. Districts Are Facing: How the City Did It — and What Advocates Say Still Needs to Be Done | The 74 Million

On May 27, 2020, D.C. Policy Center Education Policy Initiative Director Chelsea Coffin was quoted by The 74 Million: These students’ “lived experience are going to look quite different in the coming months, perhaps from income shock or doubling up on housing, stress in the household, and other ways,” said Chelsea Coffin,…

May 27, 2020 | D.C. Policy Center
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John Wall on helping Washington residents with rent assistance: ‘I come from that type of environment’ | The Undefeated

On May 26, 2020, the D.C. Policy Center’s article, Pandemic-induced unemployment has hit the District’s Hispanic, Latino, and younger workers more intensely, was cited by The Undefeated: Washington is one of a few areas, and NBA markets, that has yet to fully reopen businesses and public spaces since President Donald Trump declared…

May 26, 2020 | D.C. Policy Center
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Activists push for tax increases, more child care spending in D.C. budget | Washington Post

On May 19, 2020, the D.C. Policy Center’s executive director, Yesim Sayin Taylor, was quoted by the Washington Post: But Yesim Taylor of the D.C. Policy Center, a more centrist think tank, said the mayor was smart not to balance the budget with higher taxes. “It’s easy to say, ‘Well, cut, cut,…

May 19, 2020 | D.C. Policy Center
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Small businesses in high-rent cities face disaster. If they go under, urban life will change. | Washington Post

On May 16, 2020, the D.C. Policy Center’s article, How many small businesses are in D.C.?, was cited by the Washington Post: The pandemic is threatening the survival of independently operated stores, restaurants, bars and other enterprises in cities with vibrant, walkable neighborhoods and soaring commercial rents. In the District alone, there…

May 16, 2020 | D.C. Policy Center

Commuting Challenges Likely If Federal Workers Phase Out Telework | NBC4

On May 13, 2020, the D.C. Policy Center’s article, Trends in federal employment in D.C., was cited by NBC4: Right now, the Office of Personnel and Management says it is beginning a phased transition to normal operations and agencies will make decisions based on local rules. Just under 200,000 federal employees work…

May 13, 2020 | D.C. Policy Center
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After Six Decades, Ben’s Chili Bowl Faces Its Greatest Challenge Yet: Coronavirus | WAMU

On April 28, 2020, the D.C. Policy Center’s article, Goodbye to Chocolate City, was cited by WAMU: In 1970, the African-American population in the city stood at 71%. Five decades later, it’s less than half. Read more: After Six Decades, Ben’s Chili Bowl Faces Its Greatest Challenge Yet: Coronavirus | WAMU Related:…

April 28, 2020 | D.C. Policy Center
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The intersection of COVID-19, race and class | The DC Line

On April 23, 2020, D.C. Policy Center Executive Director Yesim Sayin Taylor was quoted in The DC Line: No one with whom I spoke was surprised by the data. The numbers amplify weaknesses and inequities in the nation’s health care system. They also underscore historic discrimination experienced by people of color, especially…

April 23, 2020 | D.C. Policy Center
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D.C. Coalition Wants Massive Tax Breaks To Help Businesses Rebound From Coronavirus | WAMU

On April 20, 2020, D.C. Policy Center Executive Director Yesim Sayin Taylor was quoted by WAMU: But the coalition’s requests come amid a wider financial crisis for the city. The District is already expecting to have to trim the current year’s $9 billion budget by more than $600 million, and maybe as much…

April 20, 2020 | D.C. Policy Center
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Business tax relief proposal inspired by coronavirus raises questions from D.C. Council | Washington Business Journal

On April 20, 2020, the D.C. Policy Center’s executive director, Yesim Sayin Taylor, was quoted by the Washington Business Journal: Yesim Taylor, executive director of the D.C. Policy Center, said this sort of tax relief has merit specifically because it is more broad-based, targeting an industry over specific businesses that would need…

April 20, 2020 | D.C. Policy Center
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Business tax relief proposal inspired by coronavirus raises questions from D.C. Council | Washington Business Journal

On April 20, 2020, D.C. Policy Center’s Executive Director Yesim Sayin Taylor, was quoted by the Washington Business Journal: Hoffman is confident the council could structure the program stringently, building in provisions that ensure that a commercial tenant has to remain open and employ a certain number of District residents to score…

April 20, 2020 | D.C. Policy Center
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Black D.C. Residents Have Been Diagnosed With COVID-19 At Twice The Rate Of Their White Peers | DCist

On April 8, 2020, the D.C. Policy Center’s article, Pushing through complacency to fight health disparities in D.C.’s African American communities, was cited by DCist: In the District, black residents compose about 46 percent of the population, with white residents representing about 1 percentage point less than that, per recent U.S. Census…

April 8, 2020 | D.C. Policy Center
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‘It Would Be Ruinous’: How Coronavirus Could Put Trump Allies In Charge Of D.C. | WAMU

On April 8, 2020, the D.C. Policy Center’s article, COVID-19 pandemic and the District of Columbia: What to expect?, was cited by WAMU: But even furloughs and two consecutive years of $600 million cuts might not be enough, according to an analysis by the D.C. Policy Center think tank. In the wake of…

April 8, 2020 | D.C. Policy Center
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The Great Replacement: Washington, DC | American Renaissance

On April 6, 2020, the D.C. Policy Center’s article, Goodbye to Chocolate City, was cited by American Renaissance: By the time he died, Marion Barry was a relic, because after 2000, the city began gentrifying. Whites returned. Crime dropped. Property values rose. Journalists, of course, mourned: “D.C., Long ‘Chocolate City,’ Becoming More…

April 6, 2020 | D.C. Policy Center

Anatomy of a rental marketplace | City Observatory

On April 3, 2020, the D.C. Policy Center report, Appraising the District’s rentals, was featured in City Observatory: Too often, our debates about housing policy are shaped by inaccurate pictures of how the housing market really works. A new report from the D.C. Policy Center provides a remarkably clear and detailed picture of the…

April 3, 2020 | D.C. Policy Center
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The DC Rental Affordability Mismatch | Urban Turf

On April 3, 2020, the D.C. Policy Center’s report, Appraising the District’s rentals, was cited by Urban Turf: DC Policy Center’s latest rental report builds on prior analysis of the city’s mismatched housing market. Read more: The DC Rental Affordability Mismatch | Urban Turf Related: Appraising the District’s rentals | D.C. Policy Center

April 3, 2020 | D.C. Policy Center
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Rent controlled apartments may slow displacement for people of color, a report finds | Greater Greater Washington

On April 2, 2020, chapter four of the D.C. Policy Center’s report, Appraising the District’s rentals, was excerpted by Greater Greater Washington: The DC Policy Center has published a new report, Appraising the District’s rentals, on rental housing in the District, and how rentals can help keep housing affordable provide more economically inclusive. We…

April 2, 2020 | D.C. Policy Center
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34,000 Units in 20 Years: DC’s Rental Market, by the Numbers | Urban Turf

On April 2, 2020, the D.C. Policy Center’s report, Appraising the District’s rentals, was cited by Urban Turf: In addition to exploring how the concept of Inclusionary Conversions could work in DC, DC Policy Center’s latest report gives a comprehensive snapshot of the city’s rental market. Read more: 34,000 Units in 20 Years: DC’s Rental Market, by…

April 2, 2020 | D.C. Policy Center
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Should DC Use Inclusionary Conversions to Meet Affordable Housing Goals? | Urban Turf

On April 1, 2020, the D.C. Policy Center’s report, Appraising the District’s rentals, was featured by Urban Turf: A new report by the DC Policy Center suggests there may only be one way to reach DC’s affordable housing production targets. Released Wednesday, the extensive report takes stock of the city’s rental housing, putting forth the…

April 1, 2020 | D.C. Policy Center
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The coronavirus — taking lives, destroying the economy | The DC Line

On March 26, 2020, the D.C. Policy Center’s article, COVID-19 pandemic and the District of Columbia: What to expect?, was cited by the DC Line: Thus far, the long-term budget impact has drawn minimal attention. The hue and cry has been for economic relief and public health protections. Echoing the view of…

March 26, 2020 | D.C. Policy Center
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A D.C. Chef’s Ambitious System to Put Restaurant Workers Back on the Job | Eater DC

On March 26, 2020, the D.C. Policy Center’s article, Food access in D.C is deeply connected to poverty and transportation, was cited by Eater DC: While Maketto’s efforts will be focused on Ward 6 residents, Bruner-Yang says the model could be applied to help out areas with more dire needs, too. Data…

March 26, 2020 | D.C. Policy Center
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How Well is DC Doing at Social Distancing? | Urban Turf

On March 25, 2020, the D.C. Policy Center’s article, A timeline of the D.C. region’s COVID-19 pandemic, was cited by Urban Turf: DC proper’s A-grade reflects a 60% decrease in the average distance travelled by city residents. This data is as of March 21st, by which time the city was under a state of…

March 25, 2020 | D.C. Policy Center
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A bind for area governments: Virus shrinks their budgets just as public need soars | Washington Post

On March 20, 2020, the D.C. Policy Center’s Executive Director, Yesim Sayin Taylor, was quoted by the Washington Post: Officials and analysts said state and local governments should move quickly to provide small businesses with grants, loans and relaxed regulations to prevent layoffs. “The most important thing that government can do right…

March 20, 2020 | D.C. Policy Center

D.C. Council members have big spending plans. Could a coronavirus slowdown ruin things? | Washington Business Journal

On March 12, 2020, D.C. Policy Center Executive Director Yesim Sayin Taylor was quoted by the Washington Business Journal: With organizers canceling a slew of conventions, sporting events and concerts, and workers increasingly urged to stay home, there’s no telling yet what sort of impact the pandemic will have on the District’s coffers. And…

March 12, 2020 | D.C. Policy Center
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Affirmatively furthering fair housing: Proposed rule fails to address discrimination and segregation | Equal Rights Center

On March 10, 2020, the D.C. Policy Center’s articles, Mapping segregation in D.C. and The rise and demise of racially restrictive covenants in Bloomingdale, were cited by the Equal Rights Center: DC’s geographic racial divide and corresponding disparities did not happen by chance but are the result of a long history of discrimination against…

March 10, 2020 | D.C. Policy Center
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Give D.C. public charter schools a chance to serve at-risk students | Washington Post

On March 9, 2020, the D.C. Policy Center’s report, 2018-19 State of D.C. Schools was cited in the Washington Post: School quality is on the rise in the District. The recent D.C. Policy Center report on the State of D.C. Schools makes plain that our traditional public and public charter schools alike have outpaced other cities…

March 9, 2020 | D.C. Policy Center
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Anatomy of a rental marketplace | City Observatory

On March 4, 2020, the D.C. Policy Center’s article, Appraising the District’s rentals, was cited by City Observatory: Too often, our debates about housing policy are shaped by inaccurate pictures of how the housing market really works. A new report from the D.C. Policy Center provides a remarkably clear and detailed picture of the…

March 4, 2020 | D.C. Policy Center
Media | Uncategorized

‘Luxury’ Amenities Aren’t Why Housing Is So Expensive In The D.C. Area | WAMU

On March 3, 2020, the D.C. Policy Center’s article, Single-family zoning and neighborhood characteristics in the District of Columbia, was cited by WAMU: In the D.C. region, vast swaths of residential areas are zoned exclusively for single-family homes, the most space-intensive and costly form of housing. For example, almost 90% of residential land in…

March 3, 2020 | D.C. Policy Center
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“Excessive” Regulation Causes 80% Home Price Premium in the DC Area, Per Trump Administration

On February 28, 2020, the D.C. Policy Center’s article, The economic costs of land use regulations, was cited by Urban Turf: Other reportage (and some Democratic presidential candidates) have also suggested that dismantling some regulations could create housing price relief by adding to supply. DC Mayor Muriel Bowser has tied current efforts to amend the Comprehensive Plan to ambitious housing…

February 28, 2020 | D.C. Policy Center
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Foggy Bottom top D.C. neighborhood for walking accessibility, report finds | GW Hatchet

On February 27, 2020, the D.C. Policy Center’s article, Where the Washington region achieves walkable density, was cited by the GW Hatchet: GW sits in an area of the city with some of the best roadways to walk to and from nearby amenities, a study from the D.C. Policy Center released last…

February 27, 2020 | D.C. Policy Center
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D.C. Public Schools Have Seen a Remarkable Turnaround in the Past Two Decades. Here Are 4 Ways to Keep the Progress Going | The 74 Million

On February 26, 2020, the D.C. Policy Center’s report, 2018-19 State of D.C. Schools, was cited in The 74 Million: The District’s public education system is now a national model, and a recent report outlines how far the city’s schools have come. The “State of D.C. Schools,” released by the D.C. Policy…

February 26, 2020 | D.C. Policy Center

WMATA can’t measure fare evasion, but still says it’s a big problem | Greater Greater Washington

On February 24, 2020, the D.C. Policy Center’s article, What is the impact of fare evasion in D.C.?, was cited by Greater Greater Washington: Metro officials say fare evasion is a big problem, and have pushed back hard against a recent DC move to decriminalize fare evasion. But a new study from the DC…

February 24, 2020 | D.C. Policy Center
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DC Teachers Standing in the Gap | The Uptake

On February 24, 2020, the D.C. Policy Center’s report, 2018-2019 State of D.C. Schools, was cited by The Uptake: Specifically, in Washington, D.C this divide has presented itself in males of color. In 2015 Black and Hispanic boys made up 43% of the student enrollment, yet their test scores and graduation rates…

February 24, 2020 | D.C. Policy Center
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Viewpoint: D.C. can help developers overcome cost barriers to housing affordability | Washington Business Journal

On February 21, 2020, the D.C. Policy Center was quoted in an opinion piece published by the Washington Business Journal: Collectively, these initiatives have the potential to create a perfect storm of good individual intentions that have the opposite effect — a halt to housing development. In fact, the warning signs are…

February 21, 2020 | D.C. Policy Center
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Barry Farm’s historic landmark designation was pitted against affordable housing | Washington Post

On February 21, 2020, the D.C. Policy Center’s article, The history and evolution of Anacostia’s Barry Farm, was cited in an op-ed in the Washington Post: In 1941, D.C.’s nascent housing authority used eminent domain to force 23 remaining land owners from their homes for the construction of Barry Farm Dwellings; as is commonly…

February 21, 2020 | D.C. Policy Center
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The Week Observed | City Observatory

On February 21, 2020, the D.C. Policy Center’s articles, Where the Washington region achieves walkable density and Roughly 36 percent of D.C.’s rental housing units are rent-stabilized, were featured by City Observatory: 4. Mapping Walkable Density.  DW Rowlands has mapped walkable density in 17 of the nation’s largest metropolitan areas.  Her maps compare…

February 21, 2020 | D.C. Policy Center
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District Line Daily: Jumpin’, Jumpin’ | Washington City Paper

On February 21, 2020, the D.C. Policy Center’s article, What is the impact of fare evasion in D.C.?, was cited by Washington City Paper: The Washington Metropolitan Area Transit Authority has suggested that more people are piggy-backing or tailgating since the D.C. Council decriminalized fare evasion in July 2019. (It should be noted that…

February 21, 2020 | D.C. Policy Center
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As The D.C. Area Grows Pricier, Can Picking Up A Side Hustle (Or Three) Make A Difference? | WAMU

On February 19, 2020, D.C. Policy Center Policy Director Kathryn Zickuhr was quoted by WAMU: Not all app-based gigging opportunities are created equal, either. In a study that looked at the activity millions of Chase checking accounts from 2012 to 2018, the web-platform economy showed growth overall. Yet earnings for jobs in transportation (like…

February 20, 2020 | D.C. Policy Center
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These maps show where the Washington region achieves walkable density | Greater Greater Washington

On February 19, 2020, D.C. Policy Center Fellow D.W. Rowlands’ article, Where the Washington region achieves walkable density, was crossposted at Greater Greater Washington. Read more: These maps show where the Washington region achieves walkable density | Greater Greater Washington

February 19, 2020 | D.C. Policy Center
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D.C. Has More High-Income Residents Than Ever Before, Audit Suggests | WAMU

On February 4, 2020, the D.C. Policy Center’s report, Taking Stock of the District’s Housing Stock, was cited by WAMU: But while the revenue bump is good news for D.C.’s coffers, the influx of high earners is making it harder for lower-earning families to find homes, according to the D.C. Policy Center….

February 4, 2020 | D.C. Policy Center
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Barry Farm Is Officially A Historic Landmark | WPGC

On February 3, 2020, the D.C. Policy Center’s article, The history and evolution of Anacostia’s Barry Farm, was cited by WPGC: Barry Farm Dwellings has existed since the 1940s, and the neighborhood includes the rich history as a home to African Americans after the Civil War, and a place that helped birth go-go. Read more: Barry Farm Is…

February 3, 2020 | D.C. Policy Center
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To support at-risk students, DC must invest | The DC Line

On January 31, 2020, the D.C. Policy Center’s report, 2018-19 State of D.C. Schools, was highlighted in an op-ed in The DC Line: Mayor Bowser’s administration has made historic investments in our education system designed to better serve students across the city. A recent report from the D.C. Policy Center suggests that those investments…

January 31, 2020 | D.C. Policy Center
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All D.C. students deserve high-performing schools | Washington Post

On January 31, 2020, the D.C. Policy Center’s report, 2018-19 State of D.C. Schools, was highlighted in an op-ed in the Washington Post: Our once-struggling public schools now are beacons of innovation and improvement for the nation. A new report by the D.C. Policy Center shows how far we have come. As…

January 31, 2020 | D.C. Policy Center
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D.C. law requiring identification of individuals behind LLCs takes effect | Washington Business Journal

On January 28, 2020, D.C. Policy Center Executive Director Dr. Yesim Sayin Taylor was quoted by the Washington Business Journal: Local real estate attorneys previously dubbed such a change “an administrative nightmare,” and it drew opposition from the D.C. Building Industry Association. Developers frequently rely on LLCs in acquiring and managing properties. Some worried…

January 28, 2020 | D.C. Policy Center
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D.C. Gains Momentum in Boosting Opportunities for Students | Education Week

On January 21, 2020, the D.C. Policy Center Education Policy Initiative Director, Chelsea Coffin, was quoted by Education Week: “I think [the expansion of pre-K] got a lot of momentum for families to stay,” said Chelsea Coffin, the director of the education policy initiative at the D.C. Policy Center, a nonpartisan think…

January 21, 2020 | D.C. Policy Center
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D.C. Gains Momentum in Boosting Opportunities for Students | Education Week

On January 21, 2020, the Director of the D.C. Policy Center Education Policy Initiative, Chelsea Coffin, was quoted by Education Week: “I think [the expansion of pre-K] got a lot of momentum for families to stay,” said Chelsea Coffin, the director of the education policy initiative at the D.C. Policy Center, a…

January 21, 2020 | D.C. Policy Center
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Report: DC schools’ enrollment, test scores increase | Education Dive

On January 17, 2020, the D.C. Policy Center’s report, 2018-19 State of D.C. Schools, was cited by Education Dive: A report on Washington D.C. public schools by the D.C. Policy Center finds enrollment has increased steadily since 2010, after decades of decline. Between school years 2014-2015 and 2018-2019, enrollment for pre-K through 12th grade…

January 17, 2020 | D.C. Policy Center
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Not all speed cameras are created equal | The Philadelphia Citizen

On January 17, 2020, the D.C. Policy Center’s article, Predominately black neighborhoods in D.C. bear the brunt of automated traffic enforcement, was cited by The Philadelphia Citizen: My analysis of moving violation citations and crash data suggests that the racial geography of D.C. does play into the enforcement of traffic violations,” wrote…

January 17, 2020 | D.C. Policy Center
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Morning Education | Politico

On January 17, 2020, the D.C. Policy Center’s report, 2018-19 State of D.C. Schools, was cited by Politico: More parents choose D.C.’s public schools over other alternatives, though achievement gaps persist for students of color, according to a new analysis from the D.C. Policy Center. Read more: Morning Education | Politico Related:…

January 17, 2020 | D.C. Policy Center
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How difficult will it be to make buildings in DC more energy efficient? It depends on the building. | Greater Greater Washington

On January 16, 2020, the D.C. Policy Center’s report, Taking Stock of the District’s Housing Stock, was cited by Greater Greater Washington: Multifamily affordable housing units are more difficult to find, as only 31% of the available housing units in the District were “potentially” affordable to families of four, according to a 2018 report…

January 16, 2020 | D.C. Policy Center
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D.C. Schools Show Improvement — But Also Persistent Challenges, Report Says | WAMU

On January 16, 2020, the D.C. Policy Center’s report, 2018-19 State of D.C. Schools, was cited by WAMU: Enrollment is growing in D.C. public schools and students are scoring higher on standardized tests, but the city school system remains deeply segregated and achievement gaps between student groups persist, according to a report…

January 16, 2020 | D.C. Policy Center
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This GIF Shows How The D.C. Area’s Demographics Have Changed Since 1970 | DCist

On January 14, 2020, the D.C. Policy Center’s article, How the region’s racial and ethnic demographics have changed since 1970, was cited by DCist: A new analysis published by the D.C. Policy Center visualizes just how the broader area’s demographics have changed over the past half-century or so. “In 1970, almost everyone lived in…

January 14, 2020 | D.C. Policy Center
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We’re #1 | 730 DC

On January 14, 2020, the D.C. Policy Center’s article, How the region’s racial and ethnic demographics have changed since 1970, was cited by 730 DC: The gentrification #DontMuteDC fights is connected with the diversification of DC’s suburbs, a long process visualized and historicized by DC Policy Center. Read more: We’re #1 | 730 DC Related:…

January 14, 2020 | D.C. Policy Center
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These maps show how racial demographics have changed in the region since 1970 | Greater Greater Washington

On January 13, 2020, D.C. Policy Center Fellow D.W. Rowlands’ article, How the region’s racial and ethnic demographics have changed since 1970, was crossposted at Greater Greater Washington. Read more: These maps show how racial demographics have changed in the region since 1970 | Greater Greater Washington

January 13, 2020 | D.C. Policy Center
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Is Exercise Now A Luxury Item In D.C.? | WAMU

On January 6, 2020, the D.C. Policy Center’s article, Physical activity and gym access by neighborhood in D.C., was cited by WAMU: Physical activity levels tend to vary widely throughout the city, with the lowest rates in Wards 7 and 8. In those two wards — which also have the most residents living below…

January 6, 2020 | D.C. Policy Center
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NoVa Kicked Maryland Butt in Job Growth Last Year | Bacon’s Rebellion

On January 6, 2020, D.C. Policy Center Executive Director Yesim Sayin Taylor was quoted by Bacon’s Rebellion: Thus, Northern Virginia has experienced an influx of corporate headquarters with no connection whatsoever to defense, intelligence or IT — Hilton Hotels, Volkswagen USA, and Nestle USA. Meanwhile, Maryland lost Discovery and had to fight…

January 6, 2020 | D.C. Policy Center
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Northern Virginia’s economic growth risks leaving Maryland suburbs behind | Washington Post

On January 4, 2020, D.C. Policy Center Executive Director Yesim Sayin Taylor was quoted by the Washington Post: “When large headquarters move to the metropolitan area, they almost never consider Maryland and D.C.,” said Yesim Sayin Taylor, executive director of the D.C. Policy Center. “They invariably locate in Northern Virginia, and that’s…

January 4, 2020 | D.C. Policy Center
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Here’s the best way to build a Purple Line link between Bethesda and Tysons | Greater Greater Washington

On December 27, 2019, the D.C. Policy Center’s article, The best way to build a Purple Line link between Bethesda and Tysons, was cross-posted by Greater Greater Washington. Read more: Here’s the best way to build a Purple Line link between Bethesda and Tysons | Greater Greater Washington Related: The best way…

December 27, 2019 | D.C. Policy Center
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D.C. Ranks Among The Country’s Fittest Cities, Yet There’s A Dearth Of Gyms In Wards 7 And 8 | DCist

On December 18, 2019, the D.C. Policy Center’s article, Physical activity and gym access by neighborhood in D.C., was cited by DCist: The divide between the District’s most active and least active neighborhoods is stark, as illustrated by data from the 500 Cities Project and analyzed by the D.C. Policy Center in 2017. The…

December 18, 2019 | D.C. Policy Center
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Liberal Guilt Is Officials’ Latest Tool To Build More Affordable Housing In D.C.’s Wealthiest Ward | DCist

On December 10, 2019, the D.C. Policy Center’s article, Single-family zoning and neighborhood characteristics in the District of Columbia, was cited by DCist: Bowser has not proposed banning single-family zoning, which takes up three-quarters of all tax lots in the city, according to the D.C. Policy Center. “It would not be popular” in…

December 10, 2019 | D.C. Policy Center
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DC students face violence and transit delays on their commute to school | Greater Greater Washington

On November 25, 2019, the D.C. Policy Center’s report, Access to schools that level the playing field for D.C.’s at-risk students, was cited by Greater Greater Washington: On July 9, 2019 At-Large Councilmember David Grosso introduced the Safe Passage to School Expansion Act, which would create an Office of Safe Passage and provide shuttle buses…

November 25, 2019 | D.C. Policy Center
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District Links: AG Karl Racine hires recent defense atty for Rayful Edmond III | The DC Line

On November 15, 2019, the D.C. Policy Center’s article, The impact of occupational licensing requirements in D.C., was cited by The DC Line’s District Links newsletter: REPORT – ‘The impact of occupational licensing requirements in D.C.’ D.C. Policy Center’s Yesim Sayin Taylor: “The District of Columbia has many factors in its favor making it…

November 15, 2019 | D.C. Policy Center
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These maps show how incomes have changed in the region since 1980 | Greater Greater Washington

On November 13, 2019, Fellow D.W. Rowlands’ article on the region’s changing incomes was cross-posted on Greater Greater Washington. Read more: These maps show how incomes have changed in the region since 1980 | Greater Greater Washington

November 13, 2019 | D.C. Policy Center
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Tuesday Morning Notes | Tysons Reporter

On November 12, 2019, the D.C. Policy Center’s article, D.C. is behind the rest of metropolitan area in business ownership rates for women, was cited in the Tysons Reporter links roundup, Tuesday Morning Notes: Women-Owned Businesses Booming in Falls Church — “Across the Washington metropolitan area, the highest rates of business ownership for…

November 12, 2019 | D.C. Policy Center
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D.C. battle looms on spending, taxes | Washington Blade

On November 8, 2019, the D.C. Policy Center’s 2019 State of Business Report was cited by the Washington Blade: While the D.C. economy is stable and remains a strong employment center in the region, the city is struggling to retain the small and moderate size businesses generated during recent boom years. In…

November 8, 2019 | D.C. Policy Center
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Should you move to Washington, D.C.? | Curbed DC

On November 8, 2019, the D.C. Policy Center’s article, Growing labor demand in D.C. is driving up wages, was cited by Curbed DC: If you’re thinking about moving to D.C., think hard. Employment opportunities abound, but living costs are high. The weather can get brutally hot in the summer (don’t even get us started on…

November 8, 2019 | D.C. Policy Center
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The Barras Report: DC Policy Center

On November 7, 2019, D.C. Policy Center executive director Yesim Sayin Taylor was interviewed on The Barras Report: See more: The Barras Report: DC Policy Center

November 7, 2019 | D.C. Policy Center
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Small Business Owners Press D.C. Lawmakers For Financial Relief

On November 7, 2019, D.C. Policy Center executive director Yesim Sayin Taylor’s testimony to the D.C. Council was cited by WAMU: At one point during the hearing, economist Yesim Sayin Taylor contended that McDuffie and Allen’s bills would amount to little more than bandage solutions if larger changes aren’t made to the city’s business…

November 7, 2019 | D.C. Policy Center
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District Links: New report on deadly row house fire; NYT article on inaccurate breathalyzers mentions DC police; and more | The DC Line

On November 4, 2019, the D.C. Policy Center’s article, D.C. is hard to count. Here’s where officials could target efforts for the 2020 Census., was cited in The DC Line’s District Links newsletter: REPORT – ‘D.C. is hard to count. Here’s where officials could target efforts for the 2020 Census.’ D.C. Policy Center’s Mike…

November 4, 2019 | D.C. Policy Center
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Is Barry Farm a historic landmark? An upcoming ruling will shape the fate of redevelopment plans. | Washington Business Journal

On October 29, 2019, fellow Sarah Shoenfeld’s article, The history and evolution of Anacostia’s Barry Farm was linked by the Washington Business Journal: For the activists pressing for the historic designation, a vote in their favor would represent a major victory in forcing the developers to better honor the property’s history — in 1867,…

November 1, 2019 | D.C. Policy Center
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D.C. officials order changes to Barry Farm redevelopment plans to better honor the property’s history | Washington Business Journal

On October 31, 2019, fellow Sarah Shoenfeld’s article, The history and evolution of Anacostia’s Barry Farm was linked by the Washington Business Journal: However, a majority of the nine-member board did signal that they’d be willing to approve that request, if the developers can’t rearrange their plans to better honor the property’s…

October 31, 2019 | D.C. Policy Center
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GAME-CHANGER: The Nationals won it all. D.C. achieved sports town status. What does it mean for business? | Washington Business Journal

On October 31, 2019, the D.C. Policy Center executive director Yesim Sayin Taylor was quoted by Washington Business Journal: D.C. collects anywhere from $40 million to $65 million per year for its “ballpark fund” to afford those payments, budget documents show. Taxes on Nats tickets and concessions generate anywhere from $15 million…

October 31, 2019 | D.C. Policy Center
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The Comp Plan guides DC’s growth. Here’s what proposed updates say about housing. | Greater Greater Washington

On October 31, 2019, the D.C. Policy Center’s report, Taking Stock of the District’s Housing Stock, was cited by Greater Greater Washington: Other worthwhile additions include: A strong acknowledgement that new construction has favored one-bedroom units over multifamily units (though it’s necessary to build more smaller units as well to free up family-sized…

October 31, 2019 | D.C. Policy Center
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Hill Buzz 488 | The Hill is Home

On October 29, 2019, Executive Director Yesim Sayin Taylor’s article, Land Value Tax: Can it work in the District? was cited in a link roundup on The Hill is Home: An interesting blog post from the DC Policy Center on Land Value Tax and what difference it could make. Read more: Hill Buzz | The Hill…

October 29, 2019 | D.C. Policy Center
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It isn’t baseball that unites Washington. It’s the chant: ‘Lock him up!’ | Washington Post

On October 28, 2019, the D.C. Policy Center’s article, Made in D.C.: Which areas have the highest share of D.C.-born residents, was cited by the Washington Post: To be fair, recent census data shows that the majority of current D.C. residents are, indeed, transplants. Only about 28 percent of adults living in D.C….

October 28, 2019 | D.C. Policy Center
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Changes to D.C.’s comp plan could help Bowser approach her big housing goals. Here’s how. | Washington Business Journal

On October 22, 2019, D.C. Policy Center executive Director Yesim Sayin Taylor was quoted by the Washington Business Journal: “Lots of people are saying ‘where’s the money to build it?’ But that’s far less important … because the resources are in the land,” said Yesim Taylor, executive director of business-backed think tank…

October 22, 2019 | D.C. Policy Center
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Tuesday’s Must Reads | UrbanTurf

On October 22, 2019, the D.C. Policy Center’s article, Land Value Tax: Can it Work in the District?, was featured by Urban Turf’s links roundup: A DC land value tax would accelerate density where it exists, not where it doesn’t. — (Y.S. Taylor/DCPC) Read more: Tuesday’s Must Reads | UrbanTurf Related: Land Value Tax:…

October 22, 2019 | D.C. Policy Center
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Here’s where D.C. — and a N. Va. city — rank among U.S. cities for tax rates, ease of doing business | Washington Business Journal

On October 15, 2019, the D.C. Policy Center’s report, State of Business 2019: Building a Competitive City, was cited by the Washington Business Journal: In D.C., the tax burden on businesses has long been a subject of consternation, playing a role in driving businesses to flee to the Northern Virginia suburbs in…

October 15, 2019 | D.C. Policy Center
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Can Land Trusts Keep D.C. Living Accessible? | Kojo Nnamdi Show

On October 10, 2019, Executive Director Yesim Sayin Taylor discussed community land trusts as a guest on the Kojo Nnamdi Show: The cost of living in Washington, D.C. is on the rise and longtime residents are getting priced out of their homes and neighborhoods. The Douglass Community Land Trust recently made its first property…

October 10, 2019 | D.C. Policy Center
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District Links | The DC Line

On October 4, 2019 the D.C. Policy Center-produced report, 2019 State of Business: Building a Competitive City, was cited by The DC Line’s District Links roundup: NEW – The DC Chamber of Commerce’s 2019 State of Business Report is out, produced by the D.C. Policy Center. The full 56-page report focuses on how the District…

October 4, 2019 | D.C. Policy Center
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D.C. remains a strong jobs center, but business leaders warn that companies are still fleeing at an alarming rate | Washington Business Journal

On October 4, 2019, the 2019 State of Business Report written by the D.C. Policy Center was featured by the Washington Business Journal: According to a report prepared for the event by the business-backed D.C. Policy Center, the District added more than 5,000 new companies between 2010 and 2018, a 15% increase. But…

October 4, 2019 | D.C. Policy Center
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Women Who Mean Business: Yesim Sayin Taylor (Video) | Washington Business Journal

On October 3, 2019, Executive Director Yesim Sayin Taylor was featured as a member of the 2019 class of Women Who Mean Business by Washington Business Journal: Back in her days working for the D.C. government, Yesim Sayin Taylor remembers thinking that the business community all too often came forward with the same repetitive…

October 3, 2019 | D.C. Policy Center
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News from around the 50 states | USA Today

On October 2, 2019, the the D.C. Policy Center’s report, Access to schools that level the playing field for D.C.’s at-risk students,  was cited by USA Today: A new report on school access by the D.C. Policy Center shows hundreds of students can’t physically get to the school that would best suit…

October 2, 2019 | D.C. Policy Center
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Making Black history matter in public space | Brookings

On October 2, 2019, two D.C. Policy Center articles were cited by the Brookings Institution: The demolition of a public housing complex in the nation’s capital has sparked a fight over something more than displacement and gentrification: It has come to represent a larger struggle over the preservation of Black history, culture,…

October 2, 2019 | D.C. Policy Center
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Where The D.C. Schools That Help At-Risk Kids Are — And Aren’t | Kojo Nnamdi Show

On October 2, 2019, Education Policy Initiative Director Chelsea Coffin discussed the D.C. Policy Center report Access to schools that level the playing field for D.C.’s at-risk students, as a guest on the Kojo Nnamdi Show: About half of students in D.C. charter and traditional public schools are labeled “at-risk,” meaning they…

October 2, 2019 | D.C. Policy Center
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Breakfast links: Convert vacant offices into housing? A new report throws a damper on the idea | Greater Greater Washington

On October 1, 2019, coverage of the D.C. Policy Center’s report, Access to schools that level the playing field for D.C.’s at-risk students, was featured in Greater Greater Washington’s Breakfast Links roundup: Many at-risk DC students live far from help: Many DC neighborhoods with the highest concentration of at-risk students are without easy…

October 1, 2019 | D.C. Policy Center
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District Line Daily: “Kids Know It’s Not Right.” | Washington City Paper

On September 30, 2019, the D.C. Policy Center’s report, Access to schools that level the playing field for D.C.’s at-risk students, was cited by Washington City Paper: New study explores how hard it is to travel to schools that help close the achievement gap for at-risk students. [D.C. Policy Center] Read more:…

September 30, 2019 |
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At-risk students in DC don’t have access to the schools they need, according to new study | WUSA 9

On September 30, 2019, the D.C. Policy Center’s article, Access to schools that level the playing field for D.C.’s at-risk students, was covered by WUSA 9: Now, a new report by the D.C. Policy Center on school access shows hundreds of students can’t even get to the school that would best suit…

September 30, 2019 | D.C. Policy Center
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Many Of D.C.’s At-Risk Students Are Too Far Away From The Schools Most Likely To Help Them | DCist

On September 30, 2019, the D.C. Policy Center’s report, Access to schools that level the playing field for D.C.’s at-risk students, was covered by DCist: Several public elementary and middle schools in D.C. have a strong track record of helping students classified as at-risk improve their learning outcomes—but many neighborhoods with the…

September 30, 2019 | D.C. Policy Center
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With costs ever rising, D.C. lawmakers introduce rent and tax bills to help small businesses stay put | Washington Business Journal

On September 18, 2019, the D.C. Policy Center Executive Director Yesim Sayin Taylor was quoted by the Washington Business Journal: Yesim Taylor, the executive director of the business-backed D.C. Policy Center, is similarly bullish on the legislation’s potential to help companies “facing ever-thinning margins and steep competition from electronic commerce.” But she…

September 18, 2019 | D.C. Policy Center
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The Past, Present, And (Potential) Future Of D.C. Statehood, Explained | DCist

On September 18, 2019, the D.C. Policy Center’s article, Twenty years after the Revitalization Act, the District of Columbia is a different city, was cited by DCist: But there is one other element of the court system that does have a connection to statehood: D.C. is the only jurisdiction where a U.S….

September 18, 2019 | D.C. Policy Center
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Letter to the Editor: Dress codes are worth it in the long run | Tulsa World

On September 18, 2019, the D.C. Policy Center’s report, Landscape of Diversity in D.C. Public Schools, was cited by Tulsa World: Columnist Ginnie Graham’s piece used a report issued by the National Women’s Law Center that analyzed dress codes and violations among 21 Washington, D.C. public schools and charter schools. A D.C. Policy Center report in…

September 18, 2019 | D.C. Policy Center
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1,100 Units, Retail and a Two Acre Park: The Latest Plans for Barry Farm | Urban Turf

On September 6, 2019, the D.C. Policy Center’s article, The history and evolution of Anacostia’s Barry Farm, was cited by Urban Turf: The Historic Preservation Review Board is expected to rule later this month on whether to grant landmark status to the remaining units at Barry Farm. Earlier this week, development partner…

September 6, 2019 | D.C. Policy Center
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District Links | The DC Line

On September 6, 2019 the D.C. Policy Center’s article, Building the ecosystem for Black women entrepreneurs in D.C., was cited by The DC Line’s District Links roundup: “Just 18 percent of all business establishments in D.C. are reported to be owned solely by women, and only 27 percent are owned by people…

September 6, 2019 | D.C. Policy Center
Media | Uncategorized

Cities Are Changing As Young People Stay For Longer | Newsy

On September 5, 2019, D.C. Policy Center Education Policy Initiative Director Chelsea Coffin was interviewed by Newsy: “I see it the most in housing developments that are ongoing in the pipeline. We really are seeing a lot more one- and two-bedroom units being built and not as much family housing.” Coffin said….

September 5, 2019 | D.C. Policy Center
Media | Uncategorized

With more choice, DC families are unlinking their housing and school decisions | Greater Greater Washington

On September 4, 2019 the D.C. Policy Center’s article, D.C.’s disconnect between citywide enrollment growth and neighborhood change, was covered by Greater Greater Washington: A new report from the DC Policy Center shows that school-aged populations and school enrollment in the District’s neighborhoods are “decoupling.” While demand for high-quality schools has historically driven…

September 4, 2019 | D.C. Policy Center
Media | Uncategorized

DC residents launch a city-wide tenant union in hopes to foster solidarity across the District | Streetsense

On August 29, 2019, the D.C. Policy Center’s article, Made in D.C.: Which areas have the highest share of D.C.-born residents, was cited by Streetsense: In the 1950s, the Southwest part of D.C. underwent huge gentrification that forced 23,000 people to be relocated into public housing east of the Anacostia River, said…

August 29, 2019 | D.C. Policy Center
Media | Uncategorized

‘Going to bed hungry’: the harrowing reality of poor children living in DC | the Guardian

On August 29, 2019, the D.C. Policy Center’s article, Income inequality and economic mobility in D.C., was cited by the Guardian: Muthiah’s organization serves roughly 400,000 individuals in the DC region, about a third of whom are children, and she said her group has witnessed the effects of growing inequity in the…

August 29, 2019 | D.C. Policy Center
Media | Uncategorized

Citywide enrollment growth is strong but disconnected from neighborhood change | The DC Line

On August 28, 2019, the D.C. Policy Center’s Chelsea Coffin authored a commentary published by The DC Line: The 2019-20 school year will mark the 12th enrollment increase in a row for DC’s traditional public and public charter schools. This year, the city’s schools are expected to add 2,800 students to classes…

August 28, 2019 | D.C. Policy Center
Media | Uncategorized

D.C. Attorney General Settles With Company That Wouldn’t Install Windows East Of The River | DCist

On August 21, 2019, the D.C. Policy Center’s article, Discriminatory housing practices in the District: A brief history, was cited by DCist: She asked a friend to call the company back with a Capitol Hill zip code instead. When the customer service representative approved the request for service, Morgan decided to alert…

August 21, 2019 | D.C. Policy Center
Media | Uncategorized

New D.C. Development Guidelines Require More Consideration of Walkability | Planetizen

On August 17, 2019, the D.C. Policy Center’s article, Transportation is more than traffic: Measuring the impact of development on walkability, was cited by Planetizen: “In June, the D.C. Department of Transportation published new guidelines for reviewing the transportation impacts of major real estate developments,” according to an article by D. Taylor Reich. “These new guidelines…

August 17, 2019 | D.C. Policy Center
Media | Uncategorized

Today’s Headlines | Streetsblog CAL

On August 15, 2019, the D.C. Policy Center’s article, Transportation is more than traffic: Measuring the impact of development on walkability, was cited by Streetsblog CAL’s links roundup: Transportation is more than traffic: Measuring walkability (D.C. Policy Center) Read more: Today’s Headlines | Streetsblog CAL Related: Transportation is more than traffic: Measuring…

August 15, 2019 | D.C. Policy Center
Media | Uncategorized

These new development rules are made for walking | Greater Greater Washington

On August 15, 2019, a version of the D.C. Policy Center’s article, Transportation is more than traffic: Measuring the impact of development on walkability, was crossposted at Greater Greater Washington. Read more: These new development rules are made for walking | Greater Greater Washington Related: Transportation is more than traffic: Measuring the impact…

August 15, 2019 | D.C. Policy Center
Media | Uncategorized

Suburban sprawl has increased in the D.C. area since 1970: study | Curbed DC

On August 13, 2019, the D.C. Policy Center’s article, How the D.C. area’s population density has changed since 1970, was cited by Curbed DC: The population density of the D.C. region has gone up but also spread farther out during the past half-century, according to a recent analysis of U.S. Census Bureau data by…

August 13, 2019 | D.C. Policy Center
Media | Uncategorized

Grassroots groups and growers east of the Anacostia defy the ‘food desert’ label | Greater Greater Washington

On August 13 2019, a map from the D.C. Policy Center’s article, The history of Deanwood’s local foodscape, was cited by Greater Greater Washington: Map reprinted from DC Policy Center: “Grocery stores operating in Deanwood between 1925 and 1960. This map was created based on stores that were reported in the Overbeck oral history interviews…

August 13, 2019 | D.C. Policy Center
Media | Uncategorized

Monday’s Must Reads | UrbanTurf

On August 12, 2019, Executive Director Yesim Sayin Taylor’s visualization of housing types and density in Ward 3 vs Ward 6 was cited in a link roundup on UrbanTurf. Read more: Monday’s Must Reads | UrbanTurf Related: D.C. single family neighborhood density: Ward 3 versus Ward 6 | D.C. Policy Center

August 12, 2019 | D.C. Policy Center
Media | Uncategorized

A tool meant to help minorities buy homes is instead speeding up gentrification in D.C. | Washington Post

On August 9, 2019, the D.C. Policy Center’s article, A decade of demographic change in D.C.: Which neighborhoods have changed the most?, was cited in the Washington Post: Yet Washington is also the most rapidly gentrifying metropolitan area in the United States. Since 2000, 22 percent of D.C. census tracts have seen a large…

August 9, 2019 | D.C. Policy Center
Media | Uncategorized

See the difference density makes in these two parts of the District | Greater Greater Washington

On August 8, 2019, the D.C. Policy Center’s article, D.C. single family neighborhood density: Ward 3 versus Ward 6, was crossposted by Greater Greater Washington. Read more: See the difference density makes in these two parts of the District | Greater Greater Washington Related: D.C. single family neighborhood density: Ward 3 versus Ward 6…

August 8, 2019 | D.C. Policy Center
Media | Uncategorized

Systemic Inequality: Displacement, Exclusion, and Segregation | Center for American Progress

On August 8 2019, the D.C. Policy Center’s article, Goodbye to Chocolate City, was cited by a Center for American Progress report, Systemic Inequality: Displacement, Exclusion, and Segregation: Nowhere are the effects of gentrification more noticeable than the nation’s capital, Washington, D.C. Between 1970 and 2015, Black residents declined from 71 percent of…

August 8, 2019 | D.C. Policy Center
Media | Uncategorized

How DC can build more homes in exclusive neighborhoods around Rock Creek Park | Greater Greater Washington

On August 1, 2019, the D.C. Policy Center’s article, Single-family zoning and neighborhood characteristics in the District of Columbia, was cited in Greater Greater Washington: Conveniently, where the framework element says you should build, and where it says you should conserve character, roughly tracks with where in the city you are legally…

August 1, 2019 | D.C. Policy Center
Media | Uncategorized

These beautiful maps show how the region’s population density changed since 1970 | Greater Greater Washington

On July 26, 2019, Fellow D.W. Rowlands’ article on the region’s changing population density was cross-posted on Greater Greater Washington. Read more: These beautiful maps show how the region’s population density changed since 1970 | Greater Greater Washington

July 31, 2019 | D.C. Policy Center

Hill Buzz 475 | The Hill is Home

On July 30 2019, Executive Director Yesim Sayin Taylor’s visualization of housing types and density in Ward 3 vs Ward 6 was cited in a link roundup on The Hill is Home. Read more: Hill Buzz | The Hill is Home Related: D.C. single family neighborhood density: Ward 3 versus Ward 6 | D.C….

July 31, 2019 | D.C. Policy Center

Opioid Epidemic Worsens in DC Region | Streetsense

On July 30, 2019, the D.C. Policy Center was cited in Streetsense: The D.C. Policy Center says that Naloxone is safe and easy to use. In fact, it is being used in other states to help reduce the opioid-related fatalities. Every day, over 130 Americans are dying due to a drug overdose….

July 31, 2019 | D.C. Policy Center

Dear Gentrifiers: Stop putting your restaurants in historically black neighborhoods if you can’t respect the culture | EATER

On July 30, 2019, the D.C. Policy Center’s article, Goodbye to Chocolate City, was cited by EATER: Over countless happy hours, brunches, and love affairs with men who almost always attended Howard University, I became something of an adult in the five years I spent living in what was then lovingly known…

July 30, 2019 | D.C. Policy Center

District Line Daily: Yes, we sent you this newsletter at 11:00 a.m. on purpose. | Washington City Paper

On July 26, 2019, the D.C. Policy Center’s article, Implementing the NEAR Act to reduce violence in D.C., was cited by Washington City Paper: Invest in a community-based approach—namely the Neighborhood Engagement Achieves Results (NEAR) Act. Rachel Usdan of Moms Demand Action’s D.C. chapter and April Goggans, the core organizer for Black Lives Matter DC, independently…

July 26, 2019 |

The devaluation of black neighborhoods: Part 1 | City Observatory

On July 23, 2019, the D.C. Policy Center’s article, The Great Sort: Part III, was cited by City Observatory: The exit of upwardly mobile black households from majority black neighborhoods has increased economic polarization according to David Rusk of the D.C. Policy Center.  Similarly, the relatively low prices of homes in majority black…

July 23, 2019 | D.C. Policy Center

District Line Daily: House is not a Home | Washington City Paper

On July 18, 2019, the D.C. Policy Center’s article, Single-family zoning and neighborhood characteristics in the District of Columbia, was cited by Washington City Paper: To increase housing supply in D.C., rethink single-family zoning. [D.C. Policy Center] Read more: District Line Daily: House is not a Home | Washington City Paper Related:…

July 18, 2019 | D.C. Policy Center

District Line Daily: House is not a Home | Washington City Paper

On July 18, 2019, the D.C. Policy Center’s article, Single-family zoning and neighborhood characteristics in the District of Columbia, was cited by Washington City Paper: To increase housing supply in D.C., rethink single-family zoning. [D.C. Policy Center] Read more: District Line Daily: House is not a Home | Washington City Paper Related:…

July 18, 2019 | D.C. Policy Center

To expand affordable housing, D.C. should reform single-family zoning: analysis | Curbed DC

On July 17, 2019, the D.C. Policy Center’s article, Single-family zoning and neighborhood characteristics in the District of Columbia, was cited by Curbed DC: As the District advances changes to its long-term framework for development, a new report by a local think tank is calling for changes to the city’s zoning rules that would make way…

July 18, 2019 | D.C. Policy Center

Controversial Sports Betting Contract Wins D.C. Council Approval | DCist

On July 10, 2019, the D.C. Policy Center’s article, Implementing the NEAR Act to reduce violence in D.C., was cited by DCist: After a Supreme Court decision last year overturned a federal law that largely banned sports betting, states across the country lined up to set up their own legal programs and…

July 10, 2019 | D.C. Policy Center

Does renters insurance cover flood damage? | WUSA 9

On July 9, 2019, the D.C. Policy Center was cited by WUSA 9: Southeast D.C. has more people renting homes or apartments than any other quadrant, according the think tank D.C. Policy Center. The region was also hit hard during torrential flooding on Monday — but what happens if you’re a renter…

July 10, 2019 | D.C. Policy Center

Where the wealth is in the Washington region, so is the exclusion | Greater Greater Washington

On June 25, 2019, the D.C. Policy Center’s article, Concentrated Poverty – The Critical Mass, was cited by Greater Greater Washington: The Washington, DC, metropolitan area is consistently ranked as one of the most well-off in the country. Some rankings have even found that half of the top 10 highest-income counties in the country surround the…

June 25, 2019 | D.C. Policy Center

D.C.’s Sports Betting Revenue Was Set To Go To Early Childhood Education And Violence Prevention. Now It’s Not. | WAMU

On June 20, 2019, the D.C. Policy Center’s article, Implementing the NEAR Act to reduce violence in D.C., was cited by WAMU: But passage was never a certainty. There’s a long history of attempts in D.C. to legalize gambling in one form or another, and they have largely been derailed by community…

June 20, 2019 | D.C. Policy Center

Metro to study Blue, Orange, and Silver lines for potential improvements | Curbed DC

On June 18, 2019, Fellow Ethan Finlan’s article on Metro’s ridership crisis was cited by Curbed DC: Another reason Blue, Orange, and Silver line trains can be crowded: scheduled repair work. Four Blue Line stations in Virginia are currently shuttered for repairs through September 8. A 2018 report by the D.C. Policy Center, meanwhile, found…

June 18, 2019 | D.C. Policy Center

Why we don’t support traffic enforcement | Our Streets MPLS

On June 18, 2019, the D.C. Policy Center’s article, Predominately black neighborhoods in D.C. bear the brunt of automated traffic enforcement, was cited by Our Streets MPLS: Washington D.C. adopted Vision Zero in 2015. The City went into Vision Zero with black residents making up 70% of traffic related arrests, despite making…

June 18, 2019 | D.C. Policy Center

5 questions for Bowser’s new health care commission | Washington Business Journal

On June 6, D.C Policy Center Executive Director Yesim Sayin Taylor was quoted in a Washington Business Journal article on the Bowser Administration’s newly announced health commission: “I’m not sure if this is the most efficient way for the District to move forward, trying to breathe life into hospitals that aren’t breathing…

June 6, 2019 | D.C. Policy Center

D.C. residents confront ‘stark disparities’ in pharmacy access, analysis finds | Curbed DC

On June 3, 2019, Curbed D.C.’s Andrew Giambrone covered the D.C. Policy Center analysis of pharmacy access: Obtaining medication and other healthcare products at traditional pharmacies appears to be more difficult east of the Anacostia River than west, according to a new report by local think tank D.C. Policy Center (DCPC). Citing…

June 3, 2019 | D.C. Policy Center

DC Council sidesteps financial responsibility | The DC Line

On May 30, 2019, D.C. Policy Center Executive Director Yesim Sayin Taylor was quoted in a The DC Line commentary on the 2019 D.C. budget: “That was just a distraction, however. Legislators didn’t address the fundamental problems with Bowser’s 2020 budget proposal. They supported her decision to increase taxes in a budget document…

May 30, 2019 | D.C. Policy Center

In Increasingly Expensive D.C., A Longtime Black Bookstore Looks For Tax Relief | DCist

On May 29, 2019, D.C. Policy Center Executive Director Yesim Sayin Taylor was quoted in a DCist article on tax abatements for small D.C. businesses: “Both Sankofa and Players Lounge “mean something for the customers,” says Yesim Sayin Taylor, the executive director of the D.C. Policy Center. “I think that’s one of…

May 29, 2019 | D.C. Policy Center

Increasing Housing Supply and Attainability: Improving Rules & Engagement to Build More Housing | ULI Washington

In May 2019, a D.C. Policy Center map of the types of housing stock in D.C. from the report Taking Stock of the District’s Housing Stock was published in ULI Washington’s Increasing Housing Supply and Attainability: Read more: Increasing Housing Supply and Attainability: Improving Rules & Engagement to Build More Housing | ULI…

May 24, 2019 | D.C. Policy Center

Our children know they’re attending segregated schools. We need policies that will bring equitable integration. | The DC Line

On May 23, 2019, D.C. Policy Center’s report, Landscape of Diversity in D.C. Public Schools was cited in a commentary on The DC Line on school segregation: “As we mark the 65th anniversary of the Brown v. Board of Education decision that ruled racial school segregation unconstitutional, a new study from the Civil Rights Project at the…

May 23, 2019 | D.C. Policy Center

Bowser and D.C. Council offer competing visions on affordable-housing crisis | Washington Post

On May 22, 2019, D.C. Policy Center Executive Director Yesim Sayin Taylor was quoted in a Washington Post article on affordable housing funding in the 2019 D.C. budget: “Yesim Sayin Taylor of the D.C. Policy Center, a centrist think tank, said rental vouchers can be looked at as an operating subsidy for…

May 22, 2019 | D.C. Policy Center

Rule-Breaking You’re Not Allowed to Notice | American Renaissance

On May 21, 2019, the D.C. Policy Center’s article, A decade of demographic change in D.C.: Which neighborhoods have changed the most?, was cited by American Renaissance: Unlike WMATA, Washington is getting whiter. The new arrivals are mostly urban professionals who overwhelmingly liberal (Hillary Clinton got 91 percent of DC’s vote in 2016). They may…

May 21, 2019 | D.C. Policy Center

The DC Lineup for this weekend: bike rides, community festivals and attention to social issues | The DC Line

On May 17, 2019, Education Policy Initiative Director Chelsea Coffin’s appearance on a panel at the Bolling 65th Anniversary Community Event was cited by The DC Line: May 17, 2019, marks the 65th anniversary of the Supreme Court’s landmark rulings in Brown v. Board of Education and Bolling v. Sharpe, a challenge to school segregation…

May 21, 2019 | D.C. Policy Center

Mars Food announces $115k grant to support food nutrition and sustainability in DC | WUSA 9

On May 17, 2019, D.C. Policy Center was cited in a WUSA 9 article on food access in Wards 7 and 8: “Food deserts make up about 11% of DC’s total area and are mostly concentrated in Wards 7 and 8 according to DC Policy Center.” Read more: Mars Food announces $115k grant to…

May 17, 2019 | D.C. Policy Center

A Tree Fell On The National Mall, And We All Heard About It | WAMU

On May 16, 2019, Fellow Randy Smith’s report on urban heat islands in D.C. was cited by WAMU: In 2015, the D.C. Policy Center studied a satellite image that showed neighborhoods with little tree cover like Ivy City and Trinidad recorded temperatures of 102 degrees, while areas like Rock Creek Park recorded 76 degrees….

May 16, 2019 | D.C. Policy Center

The District plans to slash a popular tax incentive. But a much broader battle could be ahead | Washington Business Journal

On May 16, 2019, D.C. Policy Center Executive Director Yesim Sayin Taylor was quoted in a Washington Business Journal article on the District’s Qualified High Technology Company tax credit program: “Yesim Taylor, the executive director of the D.C. Policy Center, agreed that the current credit was outdated and largely ineffective, saying it began…

May 16, 2019 | D.C. Policy Center

How long will you live? Your neighborhood might hold the answer | WUSA 9

On May 15, 2019, Fellow Randy Smith’s report on food equity in D.C. was cited by WUSA 9: In 2017, a report by the D.C. Policy Center found that the overwhelming majority of the city’s food deserts were east of the Anacostia, with more than half located in Ward 8 alone. A food…

May 15, 2019 | D.C. Policy Center

The Young and Restless in Black and White | City Observatory

On May 14, 2019, the D.C. Policy Center’s article, The Great Sort: Part III, was cited by City Observatory: The varied racial pattern of urban location by education has important implications for understanding neighborhood change. In part, it fits with a stereotypical view of gentrification, fueled by well educated young whites. But…

May 14, 2019 | D.C. Policy Center

Shaw Middle School advocates: Two communities, two buildings and one red herring | The DC Line

On May 13, 2019, the D.C. Policy Center’s report, Landscape of Diversity in D.C. Public Schools, was cited by The DC Line: The Banneker community of high-achieving black and Latino scholars, whose students are chosen from a highly selective citywide application pool, was pitted against another community — the growing and improving by-right elementary…

May 13, 2019 | D.C. Policy Center

Bowser’s proposed real estate tax hikes look set to pass, even as D.C. Council chair blasts her tactics | Washington Business Journal

On May 7, 2019, D.C. Policy Center Executive Director Yesim Sayin Taylor was quoted in a Washington Business Journal article on reactions to Mayor Bowser’s proposed tax increases: “Yesim Sayin Taylor, a close watcher of the budget process as the executive director of the D.C. Policy Center, believes that Bowser’s team is using…

May 7, 2019 | D.C. Policy Center

A Controversial Solution To D.C.’s Housing Crisis: Help The Middle Class | WAMU

On May 2, 2019, Executive Director Yesim Taylor’s report on D.C.’s housing stock was cited by WAMU: In her proposed 2020 budget, D.C. Mayor Muriel Bowser has called for the creation of an unprecedented $20 million “workforce housing” fund that would subsidize homes affordable to middle-income professionals like teachers, social workers, first…

May 2, 2019 | D.C. Policy Center

Advocates Say It’s Time For D.C. To Have Its Own Parole Board Again | DCist

On May 1, 2019, the D.C. Policy Center’s article, Twenty years after the Revitalization Act, the District of Columbia is a different city, was cited by DCist: The District once had its own parole board. That changed with the National Capital Revitalization and Self-Government Improvement Act of 1997, in which the city traded an annual…

May 1, 2019 | D.C. Policy Center

The District’s Proposed Fiscal Year 2020 Budget is a Harbinger of Great Fiscal Reckoning cited by Greater Greater Washington

On May 1, 2019, The District’s Proposed Fiscal Year 2020 Budget is a Harbinger of Great Fiscal Reckoning by D.C. Policy Center Executive Director Yesim Sayin Taylor was cited by Greater Greater Washington in its Breakfast links news roundup. Read more: Breakfast Links | Greater Greater Washington Related: The District’s Proposed Fiscal Year…

May 1, 2019 | D.C. Policy Center

Bill would require D.C. government to work toward racial equity | Curbed DC

On April 25, 2019, Deputy Director of Policy Kathryn Zickuhr’s report on racial inequities in fines and fees in D.C. was cited by Curbed DC: A pending bill authored by Ward 5 D.C. Councilmember Kenyan McDuffie would require the District government to explicitly consider racial equity when evaluating “programs, policies, and practices,” starting…

April 25, 2019 | D.C. Policy Center

Implementation of the NEAR Act and Public Safety Equity | DCFPI

On April 24, 2019, D.C. Policy Center Fellow Brent Cohen’s 2017 article on the implementation of the Neighborhood Engagement Achieves Results (NEAR) Act was cited by the DC Fiscal Policy Institute: The Neighborhood Engagement Achieves Results Act (NEAR Act) takes a different approach to public safety, seeking to address the root causes…

April 24, 2019 | D.C. Policy Center

Rideshare discount gives seniors in Wards 7 and 8 temporary relief in a food desert | Washington Post

On April 24, 2019, D.C. Policy Center Fellow Randy Smith’s analysis of food deserts in D.C. was cited by the Washington Post: A 2017 study by the D.C. Policy Center found that 80 percent of food deserts in the District — where residents do not have easy access to groceries — were…

April 24, 2019 | D.C. Policy Center

Residents In Southeast D.C. Look To Expand Food Options With Co-op | WAMU

On April 23, 2019, D.C. Policy Center Fellow Randy Smith’s analysis of food deserts in D.C. was cited by WAMU: “Our mission is to provide accessible, affordable, sustainable, healthy food for the communities that don’t have good access to grocery stores,” says Clarice Manning, a member of the Community Grocery Cooperative and…

April 23, 2019 | D.C. Policy Center

Mapping Segregation in D.C. cited by The Hill is Home

On April 23, 2019, Mapping Segregation in D.C. by D.C. Policy Center Fellow Sarah Shoenfeld was cited by The Hill is Home in the Hill Buzz link roundup. Read more: Hill Buzz | The Hill is Home Related: Mapping segregation in D.C. | D.C. Policy Center

April 23, 2019 | D.C. Policy Center

Some D.C. Residents Can Exchange Prescriptions for Produce at Giant on Alabama Ave. SE | WCP

On April 22, 2019, D.C. Policy Center Fellow Randy Smith’s analysis of food deserts in D.C. was cited by the Washington City Paper: In practice, the program is relatively straightforward. First, a patient obtains a prescription from their AmeriHealth Caritas healthcare provider. Then they bring their prescription to the pharmacy inside the Giant, where a…

April 22, 2019 | D.C. Policy Center

Businesses need predictability to thrive. That’s not happening in D.C. | Washington Post

On April 22, 2019, an editorial by the Washington Post Editorial Board cited a preliminary analysis of business movements by D.C. Policy Center Executive Director Yesim Sayin Taylor. Read more: Businesses need predictability to thrive. That’s not happening in D.C. | Washington Post

April 22, 2019 | D.C. Policy Center

What D.C.’s Go-Go Showdown Reveals About Gentrification | CityLab

On April 17, 2019, D.C. Policy Center Senior Fellow David Rusk’s article on D.C.’s changing demographics was cited by CityLab: In Shaw, though, gentrification isn’t some false boogieman sowing anxieties among native Washingtonians. It’s a very real thing. Those two studies measure gentrification differently, but both singled out Washington, D.C., as ground…

April 17, 2019 | D.C. Policy Center

The economy in D.C. has ‘yellow flashing signals.’ Will the council heed them? | Washington Post

On April 6, 2019, an editorial by the Washington Post Editorial Board cited a commentary by D.C. Policy Center Executive Director Yesim Sayin Taylor (published in the DC Line) on the Mayor’s proposed budget and the state of the District’s economy. Read more: The economy in D.C. has ‘yellow flashing signals.’ Will…

April 6, 2019 | D.C. Policy Center

Single-family homes take up a lot of space in the District | Greater Greater Washington

On April 4, 2019, the D.C. Policy Center’s report, Taking Stock of the District’s Housing Stock, was cited by Greater Greater Washington: This map from the DC Policy Center shows what an overwhelming amount of the District’s housing stock is comprised of single-family homes. Most of the housing outside of downtown DC…

April 4, 2019 | D.C. Policy Center

Bowser’s proposed tax hikes draw early condemnations from developers, property owners | Washington Business Journal

On April 3, 2019, D.C. Policy Center Executive Director Yesim Sayin Taylor was quoted in a Washington Business Journal article on reactions to Mayor Bowser’s proposed tax increases: “Our current tax policy protects current homeowners, but penalizes future growth,” said Yesim Sayin Taylor, the executive director of the D.C. Policy Center. “But it…

April 3, 2019 | D.C. Policy Center

DC’s budget is growing at a faster pace than economic fundamentals can support | The DC Line

On April 2, 2019, D.C. Policy Center Yesim Sayin Taylor’s commentary was published in The DC Line: Relying on short-term revenue fixes to pay for spending increases doesn’t bode well for fair and competitive tax policy. Yet this is one of several troubling aspects of Mayor Muriel Bowser’s budget proposals now under…

April 2, 2019 | D.C. Policy Center

After Five Years, Is D.C.’s School Lottery Working For Families? | WAMU

A March 28, 2019 article by WAMU on D.C.’s school lottery system cited Education Policy Initiative Director Chelsea Coffin’s report on the landscape of diversity in D.C. public schools: And for as much as the lottery is touted as a fair way to assign seats, the reality is that D.C.’s schools remain heavily…

March 28, 2019 | D.C. Policy Center

Report: D.C. is wasting millions of tax dollars annually on ‘ineffective’ incentive programs | Curbed DC

On March 27, 2019, D.C. Policy Center Fellow Randy Smith’s analysis of food deserts in D.C. was cited by Curbed DC: The DCFPI report also critiques the District’s tax incentives for grocery stores to move into underserved areas, saying these incentives cost $29 million in revenue from 2010 to 2017, with only three…

March 27, 2019 | D.C. Policy Center

Are boom days over for the D.C. budget? | Washington Post

On March 22, 2019, D.C. Policy Center Executive Director Yesim Sayin Taylor was quoted in an article by Peter Jamison in the Washington Post on D.C.’s economic outlook and Mayor Bowser’s proposed budget. Read more: Are boom days over for the D.C. budget? | Washington Post

March 22, 2019 | D.C. Policy Center

Part 7: For circumferential transit in the District, try crosstown bus lanes | Greater Greater Washingon

On March 19, 2019, the seventh and final article in Fellow DW Rowlands’s series on suburb-to-suburb transit was cross-posted on Greater Greater Washington. Read more: For circumferential transit in the District, try crosstown bus lanes | Greater Greater Washington

March 19, 2019 | D.C. Policy Center

Part 6: Where rapid bus service could best connect Maryland’s suburbs | Greater Greater Washington

On March 15, 2019, the sixth article in Fellow DW Rowlands’s series on suburb-to-suburb transit was cross-posted on Greater Greater Washington. Read more: Here’s where rapid bus service could best connect Maryland’s suburbs | Greater Greater Washington

March 15, 2019 | D.C. Policy Center

Executive Yesim Sayin Taylor profiled in The DC Line

On March 14, 2019, The DC Line published a profile of Executive Director Yesim Sayin Taylor : Taylor spent nearly a decade in the CFO’s office with no intention of changing jobs, but then Tony Williams and some of the trustees of the Federal City Council recruited Taylor to launch the D.C. Policy…

March 14, 2019 | D.C. Policy Center

Part 5: Northern Virginia needs better suburb-to-suburb transit | Greater Greater Washington

On March 8, 2019, the fifth article in Fellow DW Rowlands’s series on suburb-to-suburb transit was cross-posted on Greater Greater Washington. Read more: Northern Virginia needs better suburb-to-suburb transit. Here’s where rapid bus service could help. | Greater Greater Washington

March 8, 2019 | D.C. Policy Center

Part 4: Extending the Purple Line to Largo | Greater Greater Washington

On March 6, 2019, the fourth article in Fellow DW Rowlands’s series on suburb-to-suburb transit was cross-posted on Greater Greater Washington. Read more: Why it makes sense to extend the Purple Line to Largo, but not to National Harbor | Greater Greater Washington

March 6, 2019 | D.C. Policy Center

DC Council shelves vote on bill to increase homestead deduction | The DC Line

On March 5, 2019, the D.C. Policy Center’s article, Tax practices that amplify racial inequities: Property tax treatment of owner-occupied housing, was cited by The DC Line: Evans, a supporter of increasing the homestead deduction, concurred with Todd that the move would benefit the middle class. He said Mendelson recognized that there…

March 5, 2019 | D.C. Policy Center

Food & Friends Partnership Helps New and Expectant Mothers in D.C.’s Food Deserts | Washington City Paper

On March 4, 2019, D.C. Policy Center Fellow Randy Smith’s analysis of food deserts was cited in a Washington City Paper article on a program that addresses food insecurity among expectant mothers: There are stretches of barren blocks in the District, bereft of grocery stores that sell fresh produce and protein. According…

March 4, 2019 | D.C. Policy Center

Part 3: The best way to build a Purple Line link between Bethesda and Tysons Corner | Greater Greater Washington

On March 1, 2019, the third article in Fellow DW Rowlands’s series on suburb-to-suburb transit was cross-posted on Greater Greater Washington. Read more: The best way to build a Purple Line link between Bethesda and Tysons Corner | Greater Greater Washington

March 1, 2019 | D.C. Policy Center

Part 2: Our region needs better suburb-to-suburb transit, but a Metro loop isn’t the best option | Greater Greater Washington

On February 27, 2019, the second article in Fellow DW Rowlands’s series on suburb-to-suburb transit was cross-posted on Greater Greater Washington. Read more: Our region needs better suburb-to-suburb transit, but a Metro loop isn’t the best option | Greater Greater Washington

February 27, 2019 | D.C. Policy Center

Part 1: Why the Washington region needs better suburb-to-suburb transit | Greater Greater Washington

On February 21, 2019, the first article in Fellow DW Rowlands’s series on suburb-to-suburb transit was cross-posted on Greater Greater Washington. Read more: Part 1: Why the Washington region needs better suburb-to-suburb transit | Greater Greater Washington

February 21, 2019 | D.C. Policy Center

D.C. Chronically Failed to Spend Federal Funds to Remediate Lead Paint Hazards | WCP

On February 21, 2019, D.C. Policy Center Executive Director Yesim Sayin Taylor was cited in an article by Morgan Baskin in the Washington City Paper on lead paint remediation in D.C.: D.C.’s housing stock is, in a word, old. The U.S. Census Bureau’s 2013 American Housing Survey shows that the median housing…

February 21, 2019 | D.C. Policy Center

How bikesharing could be more family-friendly in DC | Greater Greater Washington

On February 18, 2019, Contributing Fellow Canaan Merchant’s article on family-friendly biking was cross-posted on Greater Greater Washington. Read more: How bikesharing could be more family-friendly in DC | Greater Greater Washington

February 18, 2019 | D.C. Policy Center

End stop and frisk in D.C. | Washington Post

On February 15, 2019, the D.C. Policy Center’s article, Implementing the NEAR Act to reduce violence in D.C., was cited by D.C. Councilmember Brianne K. Nadeau in the Local Opinions section of the Washington Post: That’s why I am calling on the mayor and my colleagues on the council to fully invest…

February 15, 2019 | D.C. Policy Center

How to make bike share family-friendly | Better Bike Share Partnership

On February 14, 2019, the Better Bike Share Partnership published a post about D.C. Policy Center Contributing Fellow Canaan Merchant’s article on family-friendly bikeshare: Over the past few years, bike sharing has become a familiar sight in most American cities. But despite some age diversity in who rides bike share, there’s a…

February 14, 2019 | D.C. Policy Center

Hill Buzz | The Hill is Home

On February 12, 2019, Education Policy Initiative Director Chelsea Coffin’s article on diversity in D.C. schools was cited in a link roundup on The Hill is Home. Read more: Hill Buzz | The Hill is Home Related: Racial and ethnic diversity over time in D.C.’s schools | D.C. Policy Center

February 12, 2019 | D.C. Policy Center

Maya Martin Cadogan: Real school choice starts with parent voice | The DC Line

On January 30, 2019, a D.C. Policy Center report on the connections between neighborhood characteristics and boundary school enrollment rates was cited in a commentary by Maya Martin Cadogan: As DC parents finalize their school preferences before upcoming lottery deadlines, it’s worth resurfacing a recent study by the D.C. Policy Center. It found only…

January 30, 2019 | D.C. Policy Center

In an Unequal America, Getting to Work Can Be Hell | The Nation

On January 29, 2019, D.C. Policy Center Executive Director Yesim Sayin Taylor was quoted in an article about transit deserts: Consider: In 2005, according to statistics, some 3.1 million workers nationwide commuted for 90 minutes or more one way, as Blough does, but that number had nudged up to 4 million by…

January 29, 2019 | D.C. Policy Center

Analysis of D.C. startups featured on U.S. Census Bureau website

D.C. Policy Center Fellow Shirin Arslan’s analysis of opportunity costs among startups in D.C. was featured on the U.S. Census Bureau’s Longitudinal Employer-Household Dynamics Program’s website. Read more: D.C.’s Startup Scene, Part II: Opportunity Costs | D.C. Policy Center

January 22, 2019 | D.C. Policy Center

Which Came First, the DC Food Desert or the Dollar Store? | UrbanTurf

On January 22, 2019, D.C. Policy Center Fellow Randy Smith’s map of food deserts was cited in UrbanTurf’s coverage of a report on the impact of Dollar Stores on food deserts. Read more: Which Came First, the DC Food Desert or the Dollar Store? | UrbanTurf Related: Food access in D.C is…

January 22, 2019 | D.C. Policy Center

A Place-Based Approach Is Helping D.C. Children in Poverty Succeed | American Communities Project

D.C. Policy Center Fellow Becky Strauss was quoted by The George Washington University’s American Communities Project in an article on place-based approaches to poverty: There is no clear roadmap for how the District will solve the problem. “It’s sort of surprising how little we know about closing the inequality gap in cities,”…

January 11, 2019 | D.C. Policy Center

Laws & Order: Legislators In Washington Region To Debate Overhaul Of Criminal Justice Laws | WAMU

On January 9, 2019, the D.C. Policy Center’s article, Implementing the NEAR Act to reduce violence in D.C. was cited by WAMU: There has been plenty of movement in recent years in D.C. on criminal justice issues: the D.C. Council passed the NEAR Act, which adopts a public-health approach to reducing violence, decriminalized fare evasion on…

January 9, 2019 | D.C. Policy Center

‘We Have To Think Bigger About It’: Bowser Says D.C. Must Ramp Up Housing Construction | WAMU

On January 8, 2019, a WAMU article cited the D.C. Policy Center’s 2018 report on the District’s housing stock. D.C. needs more housing — and fast. That’s the message Mayor Muriel Bowser is sending as she starts her second term in office, saying that housing construction will have to ramp up significantly over…

January 8, 2019 | D.C. Policy Center

Lyft is offering low-cost rides to grocery stores in Wards 7 and 8. What’s a sustainable solution? | Greater Greater Washington

On January 7, 2019, a D.C. Policy Center analysis of food deserts was cited by a Greater Greater Washington post on a partnership between Lyft and Martha’s Table to provide low-income residents in Wards 7 and 8 with low-cost rides to the grocery store. Read more: Lyft is offering low-cost rides to grocery stores…

January 7, 2019 | D.C. Policy Center

Working Through Growing Pains in Artist/Community Developer Collaborations | Shelterforce

The D.C. Policy Center symposium on racial equity in housing outcomes was cited in a roundup of cross-sector collaborations from Shelterforce: In Washington, DC, an ongoing affordable housing crisis, coupled with longstanding racial inequities in employmentand income, have resulted in dramatic demographic changes in many neighborhoods that were previously disinvested in, and were predominantly Black….

January 7, 2019 | D.C. Policy Center

Illicit Guns Fuel 38% Murder Increase in Washington, D.C. | Wall Street Journal

On January 4, 2019, D.C. Policy Center Executive Director Yesim Sayin Taylor was cited in a Wall Street Journal article on the city’s spike in homicides in 2018: The city has improved by many measures. Over the past 10 years, the number of employed residents rose 32%, the jobless rate fell by…

January 4, 2019 | D.C. Policy Center

Executive Director Yesim Sayin Taylor interviewed on Important, Not Important podcast

Executive Director Yesim Sayin Taylor interviewed on the Important, Not Important podcast in an episode released January 1, 2019: In Episode 50, Quinn & Brian discuss: How D.C. and LA are dealing with urban heat issues. Our guests are Yesim Sayin Taylor and Molly Peterson. Yesim is the founding Executive Director of…

January 2, 2019 | D.C. Policy Center

2018 Was the Year Cities Trusted Amazon | CityLab

On December 31, 2018, a CityLab article on Amazon’s HQ2 hunt cited an analysis by D.C. Policy Center Executive Director Yesim Sayin Taylor: The choice was also a relief, for some. With only 25,000 workers each, the new HQs will be more glorified office expansions than full-fledged satellite campuses. Their housing markets…

December 31, 2018 | D.C. Policy Center

Food Deserts Get a Lyft With Low Cost Rides | Forbes

On December 27, 2018, the D.C. Policy Center was cited in a Forbes article, “Food Deserts Get a Lyft With Low Cost Rides.” A major hurdle for people living in food desserts is transportation and Lyft has taken another step in trying to fix that. The ride hailing service has teamed up…

December 27, 2018 | D.C. Policy Center

DC students are more likely to attend schools that are economically diverse than racially diverse | GGWash

On December 21, 2018, Greater Greater Washington covered a new report from the D.C. Policy Center on economic and racial diversity in D.C. public schools and public charter schools: D.C.’s racial, ethnic, and socioeconomic demographics are changing, but are these demographic changes reflected in D.C.’s public schools? A new report from the D.C….

December 21, 2018 | D.C. Policy Center

New figures shows decline in number of low-income workers who ride Metro | Washington Post

  Executive Director Yesim Sayin Taylor was interviewed for a December 18, 2018 article in the Washington Post about Metro ridership: David Alpert, founder and president of the civic group Greater Greater Washington, said the fare increases also hurt those who have to take a combination of a bus and a train…

December 18, 2018 | D.C. Policy Center

As D.C. Grows More Diverse, Report Shows Public Schools Remain Racially Segregated | WAMU

On December 17, 2018, WAMU explored the findings of Landscape of Diversity in D.C. Public Schools, a new report by Education Policy Initiative Director Chelsea Coffin: D.C. residents talk about the city’s shifting demographics all the time. Since 2006, the District has become wealthier, whiter and younger. And residents see the changes…

December 17, 2018 | D.C. Policy Center

D.C.-born residents predominantly live on the eastern end of the city | Curbed DC

On December 14, 2018, Curbed DC covered Fellow Mike Maciag’s analysis of where D.C.-born residents live, and how the share of D.C.-born residents has changed over time: Read more: D.C.-born residents predominantly live on the eastern end of the city, analysis shows | Curbed DC Related: Made in D.C.: Which areas have the highest share of D.C.-born residents…

December 14, 2018 | D.C. Policy Center

So, No One is From DC, Huh? | UrbanTurf

On December 13, 2018, UrbanTurf covered Fellow Mike Maciag’s analysis of where D.C.-born residents live, and how the share of D.C.-born residents has changed over time. Read more: So, No One is From DC, Huh? | UrbanTurf Related: Made in D.C.: Which areas have the highest share of D.C.-born residents | D.C. Policy Center

December 13, 2018 | D.C. Policy Center

Map: Here’s Where Native Washingtonians Live (And Don’t Live) In D.C. | DCist

On December 13, 2018, DCist covered Fellow Mike Maciag’s analysis of where D.C.-born residents live, and how the share of D.C.-born residents has changed over time: Here’s something most everybody living in D.C. already knows: This city looks very different today than it did in the relatively recent past. In the last…

December 13, 2018 | D.C. Policy Center

D.C.’s Development Boom Exacerbates Frustrations with First Source Law | Washington City Paper

On December 13, 2018, Executive Director Yesim Sayin Taylor was quoted in a Washington City Paper article on the District’s First Source law: As D.C. undergoes a boom of new commercial and residential construction, the question of how to make First Source more effective has become particularly urgent. This year, Councilmembers Brianne Nadeau (Ward…

December 13, 2018 | D.C. Policy Center

The disappearing bank branch | Washington Business Journal

Washington Business Journal quoted D.C. Policy Center Executive Director Yesim Sayin Taylor in an article about the declining number of bank branches as their impact on small businesses: Some believe a change in mindset is required: A bank branch, even if unprofitable at a particular outpost, can increase the brand’s overall name…

November 23, 2018 | D.C. Policy Center

How property tax exemptions amplify racial inequity | Greater Greater Washington

Executive Director Yesim Sayin Taylor’s essay Tax practices that amplify racial inequities: Property tax treatment of owner-occupied housing was republished on Greater Greater Washington on November 19, 2018. Read more: How property tax exemptions amplify racial inequity | Greater Greater Washington   This publication is part of a broader series of essays…

November 19, 2018 | D.C. Policy Center

Family Ties Inspire Robert White’s Policies Helping Returning Citizens | Washington City Paper

On November 15, 2018, the Washington City Paper mentioned the D.C. Policy Center’s research on the life outcomes of D.C.’s returning citizens: A 2018 analysis of data by the D.C. Policy Center found that at least 43 percent of the nearly 10,000 people supervised by the Court Services and Offender Supervision Agency…

November 15, 2018 | D.C. Policy Center

D.C. Moves to Limit Short-Term Rentals | Next City

On November 15, 2018, Next City has extensively used D.C. Policy Center’s research on the impact of Airbnb in the District of Columbia: Research into how Airbnb has affected D.C.’s housing supply, in particular, is largely anecdotal, but a report from the independent D.C. Policy Center earlier this year suggested that Airbnb…

November 15, 2018 | D.C. Policy Center

There’s Already A Housing Crisis In The D.C. Area | WAMU

D.C. Policy Center Executive Director Yesim Sayin Taylor was quoted in a WAMU segment and article on November 14, 2018 about Amazon’s HQ2 announcement: At the D.C. Policy Center, economist Yesim Sayin Taylor puts it even more succinctly, describing the so-called “Amazon effect” as “an unimpressive flare in the region’s chronic housing…

November 14, 2018 | D.C. Policy Center

Amazon HQ2 Goes to New York City and Northern Virginia | CityLab

D.C. Policy Center Executive Director Yesim Sayin Taylor was quoted in a CityLab article on November 13, 2018 about Amazon’s HQ2 announcement: Arlington, too, has climbing median home values, reaching $664,000 this year; and the D.C. metro area is increasingly squeezed for housing supply. Lower income residents have for years been pushed…

November 13, 2018 | D.C. Policy Center

Washington won its piece of Amazon’s HQ2. Now comes the hard part. | Washington Post

Executive Director Yesim Sayin Taylor’s article How big of a deal is Amazon HQ2 for the DC Metro Region? was cited in Steven Pearlstein’s column in the Washington Post on November 12, 2018. Read more: Washington won its piece of Amazon’s HQ2. Now comes the hard part. | Washington Post

November 12, 2018 | D.C. Policy Center

Two Years After It Passed, Paid Family Leave Program Becomes Centerpiece Of D.C. Council Race – WAMU

On November 1, 2018, D.C. Policy Center Executive Director Yesim Sayin Taylor was quoted in a WAMU article by Martin Austermuhle. “Many of them will tell you that paid leave is a good idea. But businesses in D.C. are irate with the paid leave law because they feel like they’re now tasked…

November 1, 2018 | D.C. Policy Center

Meet the DC Couple Who Manage 60 Airbnb Listings – Washingtonian

On October 25, 2018, Lautaro Grinspan at Washingtonian wrote about Kate Rabinowitz’s publication “The knowns and unknowns of Airbnb in D.C.” According to the DC Policy Center, there are only 40 other hosts on the platform with more than six listings (for comparison, there are more than 2,600 hosts with just one listing)….

October 25, 2018 | D.C. Policy Center

Discriminatory housing practices in the District: A brief history – Cook Center for Social Equity at Duke

On Wednesday, October 24, 2018, the Samuel Dubois Cook Center for Social Equity at Duke University posted about Deputy Director of Policy Kathryn Zickuhr’s publication “Discriminatory housing practices in the District: A brief history“. Read more at the Samuel Dubois Cook Center for Social Equity website.

October 24, 2018 | D.C. Policy Center

Netflix’s ‘Stay Here’ Is a Cringe-Worthy Twist on Home Renovation Shows | CityLab

On October 17, 2018, an article on Airbnb’s footprint in D.C. (The knowns and unknowns of Airbnb in D.C.) by former D.C. Policy Center Senior Fellow Kate Rabinowitz was cited in a CityLab piece on short-term rentals. Read more: Netflix’s ‘Stay Here’ Is a Cringe-Worthy Twist on Home Renovation Shows | CityLab

October 17, 2018 | D.C. Policy Center

Executive Director Yesim Sayin Taylor in Washington Business Journal – Viewpoint: Will Initiative 77 reduce wage inequalities?

On October 11, 2018, D.C. Policy Center Executive Director Yesim Sayin Taylor in Washington Business Journal wrote an article for the Washington Business Journal, “Viewpoint: Will Initiative 77 reduce wage inequalities? We cannot say.” “The D.C. Council has taken a first vote to repeal Initiative 77, a measure to bring the minimum…

October 11, 2018 | D.C. Policy Center

D.C.’s Master Facilities Plan Will Shape the City’s Balance Between Neighborhood Schools and Charters – Washington City Paper

On October 10, 2018, Rachel M. Cohen at Washington City Paper wrote about Chelsea Coffin’s report “How D.C.’s Young Families May Shape Public School Enrollment.” The D.C. Auditor projects school enrollment to grow by 12,000 to 17,000 students in the next 10 years, with the bulk of that growth occurring in the…

October 10, 2018 | D.C. Policy Center

DC Looking to Hire ‘Night Mayor’ to Oversee Nightlife – NBC Washington

On October 10, 2018, Zach Vallese at NBC Washington cited Kate Rabinowitz’s publication “Mapping D.C.’s nightlife boom” in an article about D.C.’s “Night Mayor”. “The District has seen a huge boom in nightlife in recent years, with the number of bars, clubs and restaurants jumping from 800 to 1,300 from 2008 to 2016,…

October 10, 2018 | D.C. Policy Center

Report: ‘Affluent families are displacing low- and middle-income families’ from D.C. – Curbed DC

On October 10, 2018, Andrew Giambrone at Curbed cited the D.C. Policy Center report “2018 State of the Business Report: Towards a More Inclusive Economy“, which was prepared for the D.C. Chamber of Commerce. “Chief among those disruptive effects, according to the chamber, is the displacement of longtime residents who can no…

October 10, 2018 | D.C. Policy Center

TOPA doesn’t always work for small buildings, a housing fight with the National Shrine shows – Greater Greater Washington

On October 9 2018, Carolyn Gallaher at Greater Greater Washington cited the D.C. Policy Center report “Taking Stock of the District’s Housing Stock: Capacity, Affordability, and Pressures on Family Housing.” The numbers are no better for people who want to buy affordable housing. According to a new study by the DC Policy Center,…

October 9, 2018 | D.C. Policy Center

Love DC nightlife? The ‘night mayor’ job may be for you – WUSA9

On October 9, 2018, Chelsea Cirruzzo at WUSA9 cited Kate Rabinowitz’s publication “Mapping D.C.’s nightlife boom” in an article about D.C.’s “Night Mayor”. The latest position posting matches a trend in the upswing in nightlife in The District. The D.C. Policy Center reported in 2017 that the booming nightlife industry has grown…

October 9, 2018 | D.C. Policy Center

Analysis of Airbnb’s footprint in D.C. cited in Committee Report

D.C. Policy Center Fellow Kate Rabinowitz’s 2018 analysis of Airbnb’s footprint in D.C. was cited in the DC Council Committee of the Whole’s Committee Report for B22-0092, the Short-term Rental Regulation and Affordable Housing Protection Act of 2017.

October 2, 2018 | D.C. Policy Center

D.C. Council approves limits on Airbnb rentals – Washington Times

On October 2, 2018, Julia Airey at the Washington Times cited the D.C. Policy Center report “Taking Stock of the District’s Housing Stock: Capacity, Affordability, and Pressures on Family Housing.” City officials and community advocates have long worried that while home-sharing exacerbates the city’s housing shortage, especially for families. Only 31 percent…

October 2, 2018 | D.C. Policy Center

Chelsea Coffin’s publication “School-age population likely to grow most outside the Wilson High School boundary” cross-posted to Greater Greater Washington

On September 27, 2018, Chelsea Coffin’s publication “School-age population likely to grow most outside the Wilson High School boundary” was cross-posted to Greater Greater Washington. Looking at the existing stock of single-family homes with a capacity of four, very few are potentially in the affordable price range for Millennials – and not…

September 27, 2018 | D.C. Policy Center

DC issued over 1 million speed camera tickets, collected over $100 million in fines, AAA says – Fox 5

On September 26, 2018, FOX 5 mentioned William Farrell’s publication “Predominately black neighborhoods in D.C. bear the brunt of automated traffic enforcement.” Read the article at the FOX 5 website.

September 26, 2018 | D.C. Policy Center

‘This Is Going To Hurt Us.’ Restaurant Workers Push For Repeal Of Initiative 77 – WAMU

On September 18, 2018, Executive Director Yesim Sayin Taylor’s testimony on Initiative 77 was mentioned in a WAMU article entitled “Should Initiative 77 Be Repealed? Marathon Hearing Stretches Into Wee Hours.” An analyst with the Economic Policy Institute, a union-backed think tank, testified on his recent paper that shows mostly positive effects…

September 18, 2018 | D.C. Policy Center

Should Initiative 77 Be Repealed? Marathon Hearing Stretches Into Wee Hours – DCist

On September 18, 2018, Executive Director Yesim Sayin Taylor’s testimony on Initiative 77 was mentioned in a DCist article entitled “Should Initiative 77 Be Repealed? Marathon Hearing Stretches Into Wee Hours.” An analyst with the Economic Policy Institute, a union-backed think tank, testified on his recent paper that shows mostly positive effects…

September 18, 2018 | D.C. Policy Center

Thousands of additional students expected in public schools by 2026, new report says – DC Line

On September 18, 2018, Mark Lieberman at the DC Line discussed the D.C. Policy Center report “Will Children of Current Millennials Become Future Public School Students?” The report — published today and written by Chelsea Coffin, director of the center’s Education Policy Initiative — projects that the annual enrollment in the city’s…

September 18, 2018 | D.C. Policy Center

Education Policy Initiative Director Chelsea Coffin at the DC Line: “Future enrollment growth depends on DC’s public middle and high schools gaining confidence of millennial families”

On September 18, 2018, Chelsea Coffin – Director of the Education Policy Initiative – wrote an op-ed at the DC Line: “Future enrollment growth depends on DC’s public middle and high schools gaining confidence of millennial families” There is every reason to expect DC’s public school enrollment to increase in the coming…

September 18, 2018 | D.C. Policy Center

Traffic Tickets: the District Profits and Residents Pay – Washington City Paper

On September 13, 2018, Vinnie Rotanaro at the Washington City Paper quoted D.C. Policy Center Executive Director Yesim Sayin Taylor: “There is ample evidence that automated enforcement reduces fatalities,” says Yesim Sayin Taylor, executive director of the D.C. Policy Center, which has issued reports on the subject of automated fines, “but we cannot rule…

September 13, 2018 | D.C. Policy Center

D.C. Policy Center Executive Director Yesim Sayin Taylor quoted by DC Line

On September 7, 2018, Scott Nover at the DC Line quoted Executive Director Yesim Sayin Taylor: Yesim Sayin Taylor, founding executive director of the DC Policy Center, is concerned that the District’s tax policies are driving broadcasters and other companies to the suburbs. “I don’t think the government has anything against the…

September 7, 2018 | D.C. Policy Center

What Are D.C.’s Hottest Neighborhoods? Science Wants To Know – WAMU

On August 30, 2018, WAMU mentioned D.C. Policy Center Senior Fellow Randy Smith’s publication on D.C.’s heat islands in an article on a recently conducted study of heat islands in D.C. Read more at WAMU.

September 4, 2018 | D.C. Policy Center

D.C. Policy Center publication “D.C.’s heat islands” mentioned by Washington Post

On September 2, 2018, Terrence McCoy at the Washington Post mentioned the D.C. Policy Center’s publication “D.C.’s heat islands” and quoted Executive Director Yesim Sayin Taylor in an article entitled “‘I don’t want to die’: As the country bakes, studies show poor city neighborhoods are often much hotter than wealthy ones“: “Land…

September 4, 2018 | D.C. Policy Center

The Hidden Resilience of “Food Desert” Neighborhoods | Sapiens

On August 30, 2018, D.C. Policy Center Fellow Randy Smith’s analysis “Food access in D.C is deeply connected to poverty and transportation” was cited in an article in Sapiens and Civil Eats on the limits of the “food desert” framework for food insecurity. Read more: The Hidden Resilience of “Food Desert” Neighborhoods | Sapiens Related: Food…

August 30, 2018 | D.C. Policy Center

Obstacles to Employment – CSOSA

On August 30, 2018, the Court Services and Offenders Supervision Agency (CSOSA) for the District of Columbia published a blog post about D.C. Policy Center Contributing Fellow Robin Selwitz’s article, Obstacles to Employment for Returning Citizens in D.C.

August 30, 2018 | D.C. Policy Center

How much affordable housing does D.C. have? The city can’t say for sure – Curbed

On August 17, 2018, Andrew Giambrone at Curbed quoted Executive Director Yesim Sayin Taylor: “Tax data tell us how many units have some sort of tax subsidy (11,374, including the 7,000 owned by DC) but this includes government owned projects, projects with some affordability covenant, projects that receive tax preferences because of…

August 20, 2018 | D.C. Policy Center

Study: Metro’s Orange Line ridership ‘hit particularly hard’ over last decade

On July 26, 2018, Curbed DC covered Ethan Finlan’s article on Orange Line ridership. Read Curbed DC’s coverage: Study: Metro’s Orange Line ridership ‘hit particularly hard’ over last decade | Curbed DC Read the article: Metro’s ridership crisis in focus: The Orange Line | The D.C. Policy Center

July 26, 2018 | D.C. Policy Center

Ferry Tales: Could A Water Transportation System Come To The Region?

On Tuesday, July 24, 2018, D.C. Policy Center Fellow Alon Levy participated in a discussion on the Kojo Nnamdi show about whether a commuter ferry makes sense for the D.C. Region: “Water taxis already float across the Potomac and Anacostia Rivers in the Washington area. But the region doesn’t have anything like…

July 24, 2018 | D.C. Policy Center

Student loan debt, wealth divide are harming millennials’ homeownership dreams – WTOP

Executive Director Yesim Sayin Taylor was quoted in an article from WTOP about the D.C. Policy Center’s research on homeownership in the District: D.C. has seen a population boom in the last 10 years, and the bulk of that growth has come from millennials moving into the area, said Yesim Sayin Taylor, executive director of the…

July 12, 2018 | D.C. Policy Center

Washington Post cites “D.C.’s heat islands”

On Wednesday, July 11th, 2018, the Washington Post mentioned D.C. Policy Center Senior Fellow Randy Smith’s publication on D.C.’s heat islands in an article on an upcoming study of heat islands in D.C. and Baltimore. Read more: NOAA’s ‘heat island’ campaign will map which areas in D.C. and Baltimore swelter the most |…

July 11, 2018 | D.C. Policy Center

Activate Your Summer! | East of the River

On July 9, 2018, East of the River news referenced the D.C. Policy Center article Physical activity and gym access by neighborhood in D.C. Read more: Activate Your Summer! | East of the River

July 9, 2018 | D.C. Policy Center

Why is DC so hot? Meteorologists call the District a ‘heat island’ – Fox 5

On Monday, July 9th, 2018, Fox 5 featured maps from D.C. Policy Center Senior Fellow Randy Smith’s article “D.C.’s heat islands”. There are some neighborhoods that feel hotter than others. The DC Policy Center’s map of the District shows how widely temps can vary across the city. Eastern parts of the District were much…

July 9, 2018 | D.C. Policy Center

D.C. Policy Center Speed Camera Articles Mentioned by UrbanTurf

On June 29, 2018, articles about speed cameras by Contributing Fellow William Farrell (“Predominately black neighborhoods in D.C. bear the brunt of automated traffic enforcement“) and Research Associate Simone Roy (“Speed cameras in D.C.“) were mentioned in UrbanTurf’s Friday Must Reads.

July 2, 2018 | D.C. Policy Center

Why cities heat up more than the suburbs – WUSA9

On July 2nd, 2018, WUSA9 mentioned D.C. Policy Center Senior Fellow Randy Smith’s article “D.C.’s heat islands“.

July 2, 2018 | D.C. Policy Center

The fight for NEAR Act implementation continues

On June 3, 2018, D.C. Policy Center Fellow Brent Cohen’s article on the implementation of the Neighborhood Engagement Achieves Results (NEAR) Act was cited by DC for Democracy. Read more: The fight for NEAR Act implementation continues | DC for Democracy Related: Implementing the NEAR Act to reduce violence in D.C. |…

June 3, 2018 | D.C. Policy Center

Executive Director Yesim Sayin Taylor quoted in the Washington Times

On May 16, 2018, Executive Director Yesim Sayin Taylor was quoted in the Washington Times: Yesim Sayin Taylor, director of the nonpartisan think tank D.C. Policy Center, told The Times that’s good, but “the most important solution to affordable housing crises (while keeping the city vibrant) is to build more, and build…

May 17, 2018 | D.C. Policy Center

Fellow Mike Maciag’s article mentioned by UrbanTurf in their Wednesday Must Reads

On March 16, 2018, UrbanTurf mentioned D.C. Policy Center Fellow Mike Maciag’s article “Where telework is headed, and what it could mean for D.C.“

May 16, 2018 | D.C. Policy Center

D.C. to enlist ER doctors in battle against opioid addiction

On Monday, May 7, 2018, the Washington Times cited the D.C. Policy Center in an article about local responses to the opioid crisis: D.C. officials plan to administer medications that help with addiction recovery to emergency room patients in the effort to combat the opioid epidemic. The pilot program for the ER…

May 7, 2018 | D.C. Policy Center

Guest Contributor Will Handsfield’s Article “The Case for the Georgetown-Rosslyn Gondola” Quoted by ARLnow

On May 4, 2018, ARLnow mentioned guest contributor Will Handsfield’s article on the Gondola, “The Case for the Georgetown-Rosslyn Gondola”, in its Morning Notes. Read Will Handsfield’s article here.

May 4, 2018 | D.C. Policy Center

Gondola station from Georgetown to Rosslyn proposed by officials – WJLA

On Thursday May 3, 2018, WJLA mentioned Alon Levy’s article “Could gondolas and water taxis improve intraregional transportation?” in a news report on the potential of a Georgetown-Rosslyn gondola. Read Alon Levy’s article here.

May 3, 2018 | D.C. Policy Center

Applying a Racial Equity Analysis: Housing Capacity in the District of Columbia

A new one-pager from the Consumer Health Foundation (CHF) explores how to bring a racial equity lens to the issues raised in the D.C. Policy Center’s recent report, “Taking Stock of the District’s Housing Market: Capacity, Affordability and Pressures on Family Housing”: The study by the D.C. Policy Center suggests that some families…

April 26, 2018 | D.C. Policy Center

Greater Greater Washington discusses new housing stock report

On April 2, 2018, David Whitehead wrote about Executive Director Yesim Sayin Taylor’s recent housing report at Greater Greater Washington: Recently the D.C. Policy Center published a treasure trove of data and analysis that is pure candy to District YIMBYs and urbanists. There’s a lot in this lengthy report and we’ll continue…

April 2, 2018 | D.C. Policy Center

Can A Neighborhood Build Bigger–But Retain Its Character?

On April 2, 2018, D.C. Policy Center Executive Director Yesim Sayin Taylor appeared on the Kojo Nnamdi Show (“Can A Neighborhood Build Bigger–But Retain Its Character?“) to discuss the D.C. Policy Center’s new report on the District’s housing stock: A new report from the D.C. Policy Center suggests that building more apartments…

April 2, 2018 | D.C. Policy Center

Report: D.C.’s housing market is segregated, not varied – Curbed

On March 29, 2018, Curbed wrote about D.C. Policy Center’s report “Taking Stock of the District’s Housing Stock: Capacity, Affordability, and Pressures on Family Housing” (full report). They write: Washington, D.C.’s population is expected to climb all the way up to 700,000 with an average monthly growth of 803 residents. But where will…

March 29, 2018 | D.C. Policy Center

From Brightwood to Congress Heights, Putting DC Starter Homes (and Affordability) into Context – UrbanTurf

On March 28, 2018, UrbanTurf wrote about D.C. Policy Center’s report “Taking Stock of the District’s Housing Stock: Capacity, Affordability, and Pressures on Family Housing” (full report). They write: Additionally, when considering that 16,900 single-family homes fit the square footage and minimum bedroom parameters, those 4,764 “affordable” starter homes only represent 28…

March 29, 2018 | D.C. Policy Center

More Density In Upper Northwest Could Solve D.C.’s Affordable Housing Crisis: Study – WAMU

On March 27, 2018, WAMU wrote about D.C. Policy Center’s report “Taking Stock of the District’s Housing Stock: Capacity, Affordability, and Pressures on Family Housing” (full report). They write: A wide-ranging analysis of the city’s housing supply, the report released Tuesday morning shows that the dominance of single-family homes in amenities-rich neighborhoods, coupled with…

March 27, 2018 | D.C. Policy Center

Study: Families Get the Worst Shake In D.C. Real Estate Market – Washington City Paper

On March 27, 2018, the Washington City Paper wrote about the D.C. Policy Center’s report “Taking Stock of the District’s Housing Stock: Capacity, Affordability, and Pressures on Family Housing” (full report). They write: The report, led by DCPC Executive Director Yesim Sayin Taylor, used publicly available property data and year-end reports from local agencies to…

March 27, 2018 | D.C. Policy Center

Everything you need to know about the D.C. tipped wage initiative – Washington Business Journal

On March 27, 2018, the Washington Business Journal quoted D.C. Policy Center Executive Director Yesim Sayin Taylor: Of the 8,720 servers in D.C., roughly 56 percent live in Maryland and Virginia, and those commuting servers earn an average of $16 per hour. D.C. residents working the same jobs have estimated hourly wages…

March 27, 2018 | D.C. Policy Center

One Person, Three Bedrooms: DC’s Mismatched Housing Market – UrbanTurf

On March 27, 2018, UrbanTurf wrote about D.C. Policy Center’s report “Taking Stock of the District’s Housing Stock: Capacity, Affordability, and Pressures on Family Housing” (full report). They write: The dearth of family-sized units in DC has received a lot of attention, whether as part of the debate over the fate of…

March 27, 2018 | D.C. Policy Center

Executive Director Yesim Sayin Taylor appeared on the Kojo Nnamdi Show

On March 12, 2018, D.C. Policy Center Executive Director Yesim Sayin Taylor appeared on the Kojo Nnamdi Show to discuss Universal Basic Income in D.C. with Councilmember David Grosso and Jennifer Budoff, Budget Director for the Council of the District of Columbia. It would surprise almost no one that it is expensive…

March 13, 2018 | D.C. Policy Center

Universal Basic Income Could Help D.C.’s Poorest Get By, But Could The City Afford It? – WAMU

Executive Director Yesim Sayin Taylor was quoted in a WAMU article entitled “Universal Basic Income Could Help D.C.’s Poorest Get By, But Could The City Afford It?” “We have a tradition of supporting our families and low-income residents. But it really hasn’t solved income inequality and economic segregation problems. We need to…

March 5, 2018 | D.C. Policy Center

Oversight Committee Turnover Means Uncertainty for D.C. Home Rule Advocates

On February 15, 2018, Deputy Director of Policy Kathryn Zickuhr was quoted in a National Journal article on what the retirement of House Oversight and Government Reform Committee Chair Trey Gowdy means for D.C. budget autonomy. Congress has the ability to pass disapproval resolutions on bills passed by the D.C. Council, something it…

February 15, 2018 | D.C. Policy Center

Executive Director Yesim Sayin Taylor quoted by Urban Turf

In their article “Delivery Robots, Farmshares: DC Looks for Solutions to Serve Food Deserts”, Urban Turf quoted D.C. Policy Center Executive Director Yesim Sayin Taylor. Described the Economic Intelligence Roundtable focused on retail grocery access hosted by the Office of the Deputy Mayor for Planning and Economic Development (DMPED), they quoted: “Supermarkets…want…

February 12, 2018 | D.C. Policy Center

Executive Director Yesim Sayin Taylor speaks at Bisnow event

D.C. Policy Center Executive Director Yesim Sayin Taylor spoke with D.C. Council Chairman Phil Mendelson at the January 31, 2018 Bisnow Economic and Political Forecast. Read more.

January 31, 2018 | D.C. Policy Center

Alon Levy’s post “Improving bus service east of the Anacostia River” cross-posted to Greater Greater Washington

On January 18, D.C. Policy Center Fellow Alon Levy’s post “Improving bus service east of the Anacostia River” was cross-posted to Greater Greater Washington. “The good news is that it is possible to improve public transportation east of the river by integrating buses and Metrorail better. While such integration would have positive…

January 18, 2018 | D.C. Policy Center

District sees soaring revenue from speed cameras: Here they are mapped.

Washington Business Journal used a D.C. Policy Center analysis in an article on the placement of D.C.’s speed cameras. Read more: District sees soaring revenue from speed cameras: Here they are mapped. | Washington Business Journal

December 4, 2017 | D.C. Policy Center

Office of the Deputy Mayor for Education mentioned D.C. Policy Center Out-of-School Time Report

Office of the Deputy Mayor for Education (DME) mentioned D.C. Policy Center’s Out-of-School Time Report: During the event, the DC Policy Center released the report, “Needs Assessment of Out-of-School Time Programs in the District of Columbia,” commissioned by the DME to identify the current state of out-of-school time programming and analyze whether those programs…

November 9, 2017 | D.C. Policy Center

Executive Director Yesim Sayin Taylor Featured in Washington City Paper’s Annual People Issue

Executive Director Yesim Sayin Taylor is featured in the 2017 edition of Washington City Paper’s annual People Issue: Yesim Taylor was recently engaged and living in Istanbul in 1994 when Turkey hit hard economic times. So she and her soon-to-be-husband came to the United States to get master’s degrees. Before they knew…

November 9, 2017 | D.C. Policy Center

Senior Fellow David Brunori mentioned in Washington City Paper’s District Line Daily

On November 2, 2017, Senior Fellow David Brunori’s piece “Sales Tax Holiday — Great Politics, Poor Policy” was mentioned in Washington City Paper’s District Line Daily.  

November 2, 2017 | D.C. Policy Center

Senior Fellow Randy Smith mentioned in Washington City Paper’s District Line Daily

On November 1, 2017, Senior Fellow Randy Smith’s piece “Where it’s easiest to live car-free in D.C” was mentioned in Washington City Paper’s District Line Daily.  

November 1, 2017 | D.C. Policy Center

Senior Fellow Randy Smith mentioned in Greater Greater Washington’s Breakfast Links

On November 1, 2017, Senior Fellow Randy Smith’s piece “Where it’s easiest to live car-free in D.C” was mentioned in Greater Greater Washington’s Breakfast Links: The DC Policy Center measured neighborhood’s walkability, bikeability, and access to public and private transit, and found that the easiest places to get by without a car…

November 1, 2017 | D.C. Policy Center

Map: The D.C. Neighborhoods Where It Is Easiest To Get By Without A Car – DCist

On October 31, 2017, Senior Fellow Randy Smith’s piece “Where it’s easiest to live car-free in D.C” was cited in a recent DCist post: D.C. has a sterling reputation for living a car-free life, frequently notching high spots on lists that rank walkability, bikeability, public transit, car-sharing, and, well, living without a car. But not all parts…

November 1, 2017 | D.C. Policy Center

Should D.C. Join The Growing List Of Cities With A Night Mayor? | DCIst

Senior Fellow Kate Rabinowitz’s piece “As D.C. nightlife grows, it’s becoming more of a bar town” was cited in a recent DCist post on whether D.C. should have a “night mayor”: It’s tough to quantify the size of D.C.’s after-hours economy (a task that, Todd’s office notes, could be addressed by the…

October 17, 2017 | D.C. Policy Center

Fellow Alon Levy’s piece “Four ways to build a better bus system” was cross-posted on Greater Greater Washington

On October 3, 2017, Fellow Alon Levy’s piece “Four ways to build a better bus system” was cross-posted on Greater Greater Washington.

October 4, 2017 | D.C. Policy Center

Executive Director Yesim Taylor discusses local business climate on Kojo Nnamdi show

On September 20, 2017, Executive Director Yesim Sayin Taylor discussed the local business climate on the Kojo Nnamdi show: Over the past several years, the D.C. Council has passed progressive legislation raising the minimum wage and expanding the city’s benefits for paid family and medical leave. But now the Council Chairman has…

September 20, 2017 | D.C. Policy Center

Washington Post quotes Yesim Taylor on business conditions

On September 17, D.C. Policy Center Executive Director Yesim Sayin Taylor was quoted in the Washington Post in an article on the local economy: “The relationship between businesses and their employees is very complex. It’s not one-dimensional,” Taylor said. “It’s an important time to sort of stop for the moment and really understand…

September 17, 2017 | D.C. Policy Center

Is The Watergate Actually D.C.’s Biggest Polluter? – WAMU

WAMU recently investigated the data used in Senior Fellow Randy Smith’s recent piece on greenhouse gas emissions in D.C., finding that data has been misreported to DOEE for the largest emitters on the list: The emissions data didn’t receive much attention until the D.C. Policy Center published a report and interactive map on the 2014…

September 5, 2017 | D.C. Policy Center

Map: These Buildings Emit The Most Greenhouse Gases In D.C. – DCist

On August 23, 2017, DCist covered Senior Fellow Randy Smith’s map of carbon emissions. You can read the post in full here: Map: These Buildings Emit The Most Greenhouse Gases In D.C. | DCist

August 23, 2017 | D.C. Policy Center

D.C.’s Sibley Memorial Hospital Launching New Community Health Program – AFRO

In an article on August 19, 2017, AFRO cited D.C. Policy Center Senior Fellow Randy Smith’s work on food deserts: According to the D.C. Department of Health, in 2010, Ward 8 residents had the highest rates of obesity and were least likely to exercise; the second highest rates in the District were…

August 19, 2017 | D.C. Policy Center

Data Suggests D.C. Restaurant Bubble Is Bursting – DCist

On August 14, 2017, DCist covered Senior Fellow Kate Rabinowitz’s piece on churn in the District’s nightlife scene: According to a new analysis from the D.C. Policy Center, the golden days of the District’s burgeoning restaurant and entertainment industry scene may ending. The study shows that the city granted 165 new liquor licenses in…

August 14, 2017 | D.C. Policy Center

The City’s Nightlife, Restaurant Bubbles Have Basically Burst – Eater DC

On August 14, 2017, Eater DC covered Senior Fellow Kate Rabinowitz’s piece on churn in the District’s nightlife scene. You can read more in the full article: The City’s Nightlife, Restaurant Bubbles Have Basically Burst | Eater DC

August 14, 2017 | D.C. Policy Center
Media | Uncategorized

New Data Suggests D.C.’s Restaurant Bubble is Bursting – Washington City Paper

On August 14, 2017, Washington City Paper covered Senior Fellow Kate Rabinowitz’s piece on nightlife churn: A new report from the D.C. Policy Center draws several conclusions based on restaurant openings and closings over the past several years. The biggest? The lion’s share of the city’s nightlife boom may be in the…

August 14, 2017 | D.C. Policy Center

Senior Fellow Kate Rabinowtiz cited in Washington City Paper

On August 10, 2017, Washington City Paper cited a study by Senior Fellow Kate Rabinowitz that explored how LGBTQ places and spaces in D.C. have changed over time: If a new, expansive gay club opens, it will buck a long trend. As Kate Rabinowtiz, founder of the website DataLensDC, has shown in interactive…

August 10, 2017 | D.C. Policy Center

D.C. becoming more of a nightlife ‘bar town’: report – Washington Blade

On August 4, 2017, the Washington Blade covered Senior Fellow Kate Rabinowitz’s research on the changing nightlife in D.C.: Despite the modern-era reduction in license-class distinctions, a report released by the D.C. Policy Center last week revealed that “D.C. is becoming more of a bar town.” This followed the Center’s report a…

August 4, 2017 | D.C. Policy Center

Executive Director Yesim Sayin Taylor on the Kojo Nnamdi Show

Executive Director Yesim Sayin Taylor was a guest on the Kojo Nnamdi show on August 3, 2017. The topic of the discussion was “Should There Be A Time Limit For Local Welfare Benefits?” With only months to go before the looming October 2017 cut-off date for long-term welfare recipients in D.C., Mayor…

August 3, 2017 | D.C. Policy Center

Liquor license data analysis by Senior Fellow Kate Rabinowitz cited in Washington City Paper

Washington City Paper cited Senior Fellow Kate Rabinowitz’s recent analysis of the mix of restaurants, bars, and clubs in different neighborhoods in the July 31st, 2017 article “Nearly 70 Percent of 2017 RAMMY Award Winners Are in Northwest.” You can read the WCP article in full here.

July 31, 2017 | D.C. Policy Center

Executive Director Yesim Taylor featured on WAMU

On July 12th, Executive Director Yesim Taylor was quoted by WAMU in “No, WalletHub: D.C. Is Not The Worst-Run City In The U.S. (And Comparing It To Other Cities Is Hard.)“: “One of the reasons the District always looks bad is because we’re both a city and a state. Most cities don’t…

July 12, 2017 | D.C. Policy Center

While DC’s Population Still Grows, More Regional Residents Moving Away – Urban Turf

Urban Turf covered D.C. Policy Center Fellow Mike Maciag’s article on domestic migration in the D.C. region. While DC’s Population Still Grows, More Regional Residents Moving Away DC’s population growth has exceeded expectations in recent years, even creating demand for housing that may require construction of 127,000 additional apartments in the area. However, the…

June 21, 2017 | D.C. Policy Center

Third Straight Year: More People Leaving D.C. Area Than Moving In – WMAL

WMAL covered D.C. Policy Center Fellow Mike Maciag’s article on domestic migration in the D.C. region: THIRD STRAIGHT YEAR: More People Leaving D.C. Area Than Moving In WASHINGTON – (WMAL) It may not seem like it on the Beltway at rush hour, but the D.C. region, for the third straight year, saw more…

June 21, 2017 | D.C. Policy Center

“Demographics of walking and biking to work” article covered by the Washington Times

On June 9th, Executive Director Yesim Taylor’s piece on “The demographics of walking and biking to work…” was covered by the Washington Times: ““Urban planners and local governments attach great value to cultivating neighborhoods where residents are close to public transportation or can walk or bike to work,” the D.C. Policy Center says…

June 9, 2017 | D.C. Policy Center

Senior Fellow Kate Rabinowitz on UrbanTurf’s Friday’s Must Reads

On June 9th, Senior Fellow Kate Rabinowitz’s piece on “mapping and revisiting DC’s history of LGBT safe spaces” was mentioned on UrbanTurf’s Friday’s Must Reads.

June 9, 2017 | D.C. Policy Center

“The demographics of walking and biking to work” cited in the Daily Wrag

On June 6th, Executive Director Yesim Taylor’s piece, “The demographics of walking and biking to work tell yet another story of gentrification,” was mentioned on the Daily Wrag: “The ease with which District residents can walk, bike, or access public transportation to get to work has greatly improved over the years, particularly…

June 6, 2017 | D.C. Policy Center

Senior Fellow Randy Smith’s Piece on Food Deserts in DCist

On June 6th, Senior Fellow Randy Smith’s piece on food deserts in Washington D.C. was mentioned in a DCist report titled “Report: Wards 7 And 8 Have Three Grocery Stores For 149,750 People“

June 6, 2017 | D.C. Policy Center

Senior Fellow David Rusk’s Piece on Noam’s History Mentioned in GGW’s Breakfast Links

On June 6th, Senior Fellow David Rusk’s piece on Noma’s history titled “Once Upon A Time In Noma” was mentioned on Greater Greater Washington’s Breakfast Links.

June 6, 2017 | D.C. Policy Center

Senior Fellow David Rusk Mentioned on DCist Morning Roundup

On May 31st, Senior Fellow David Rusk’s piece on Counting Households, Not Noses was mentioned on DCist’s Morning Roundup.

May 31, 2017 | D.C. Policy Center

Senior Fellow David Rusk on Greater Greater Washington’s Breakfast Links

On May 31st, Senior Fellow David Rusk’s piece on Counting Households, Not Noses was mentioned on Greater Greater Washington’s Wednesday’s Breakfast Links.

May 31, 2017 | D.C. Policy Center

Senior Fellow David Rusk On Urban Turf’s Wednesday’s Must Reads

On May 31st, Senior Fellow David Rusk’s piece “Thermometer of City Health: Count Households, Not Noses” was mentioned on Urban Turf’s Wednesday’s Must Reads.

May 31, 2017 | D.C. Policy Center

D.C. Policy Center child care research cited in Council budget draft

D.C. Policy Center Deputy Director of Policy Kathryn Zickuhr’s publication How should we measure D.C.’s “child care gap”? was cited in the Council’s budget draft release on May 30, 2017.

May 30, 2017 | D.C. Policy Center

Fellow Brian Holland Referenced on Greater Greater Washington’s Breakfast Links

On May 26th, Fellow Brian Holland’s piece on the difference between employment and employability as workforce development goals was mentioned on Greater Greater Washington’s Breakfast Links.

May 26, 2017 | D.C. Policy Center

Greater Greater Washington cross-posts D.C. Policy Center article on health disparities

On May 23rd, Fellow Tiffany Browne’s piece on health disparities in D.C.’s African American communities was cross-posted on Greater Greater Washington.

May 23, 2017 | D.C. Policy Center

Senior Fellow David Brunori on Urban Turf’s Monday’s Must Reads

On May 22nd, Senior Fellow David Brunori’s piece on DC’s estate tax was mentioned on Urban Turf’s Monday’s Must Reads.

May 22, 2017 | D.C. Policy Center

Senior Fellow David Brunori Cited in Tax Policy Center Article

On May 17th, Senior Fellow David Brunori’s piece on District tax cuts was cited in the Tax Policy Center’s article “A Tale of Two Tax Triggers“

May 17, 2017 | D.C. Policy Center

Fellow Kate Rabinowitz Featured on DCist’s “Morning Roundup”

On May 12th, Fellow Kate Rabinowitz’s publication “Prince George’s County a Popular Home for Many Former D.C. Residents” was featured on DCist’s Morning Roundup.

May 12, 2017 | D.C. Policy Center

Fellow Kate Rabinowitz Featured on “Must Reads” on Urban Turf

On May 12th, Fellow Kate Rabinowitz’s publication “Prince George’s County a Popular Home for Many Former D.C. Residents” was featured on Urban Turf’s Friday Must Reads.

May 12, 2017 | D.C. Policy Center

DCist references A Guide to Burglaries in 2016

On May 5th, DCist referenced Fellow Randy Smith’s piece on a guide to burglaries in 2016 in an article titled “Maps: Where And When Burglaries Happened In D.C. Last Year” “A new analysis from the D.C. Policy Center looks at where and when burglaries happened in 2016, finding that they occur citywide.”…

May 8, 2017 | D.C. Policy Center

Washington City Paper mentions publication Guide to Burglaries in morning round-up

On May 5th, Washington City paper mentioned Fellow Randy Smith’s “Where, When, and Why: A Guide to Burglaries in 2016” in its “morning round-up of news, opinion, and links from City Paper and around the District“.

May 5, 2017 | D.C. Policy Center

Washington Times quotes Senior Fellow Kate Rabinowitz on Health Wealth Gap

On May 3rd, The Washington Times quoted Senior Fellow Kate Rabinowitz’s piece on “The Health Wealth Gap in D.C.” in a piece called “D.C.’s poorest residents more likely to have health issues, says new report” “Looking at this more-detailed view of health across income groups makes clear the wealth gap that exists…

May 4, 2017 | D.C. Policy Center

Greater Greater Washington Cross Post: Metrorail changes mean even shorter hours than other transit systems

Senior Fellow Daniel Rowlands publication Metrorail changes mean even shorter hours than other transit systems has been cross posted on the Greater Greater Washington website.

May 2, 2017 | D.C. Policy Center

Washington Post quotes Executive Director Yesim Taylor on tax cuts

On April 27th, the Washington Post quoted D.C. Policy Center Executive Director Yesim Taylor in a article titled “D.C. Council is urged to consider delaying landmark tax cuts”: Yesim Sayin Taylor, executive director of the D.C. Policy Center — a think tank aligned with the business-oriented Federal City Council — said she…

April 27, 2017 | D.C. Policy Center

Fellow Dan Rowlands Featured on Thursday’s (4/20/2017) Must Reads on Urbanturf

On April 20th, Fellow Dan Rowlands’ piece “Metrorail changes mean even shorter hours than other transit systems” was featured on Urbanturf’s Thursday’s Must Reads.

April 20, 2017 | D.C. Policy Center

The Washington Times quotes Fellow David Bishop on technology fees

On April 18th, The Washington Times quoted Fellow David Bishop’s piece on technology fees in an article titled “Report: Little benefit from ‘technology fee’ levied” ““Eight years have passed since the adoption of the technology fee, and it is hard to find any clear evidence of how the city uses the money…

April 18, 2017 | D.C. Policy Center

Bloomberg quotes Executive Director Yesim Taylor on the D.C. Economy

On April 17th, Bloomberg quoted D.C. Policy Center Executive Director Yesim Taylor in a article titled “Trump’s D.C. Economy Plans for Life Beyond Millennials”  “Taylor, the founder and director of the D.C. Policy Center and former director of fiscal and legislative analysis for the city’s government, laments that the region isn’t diversified…

April 17, 2017 | D.C. Policy Center

Washington Business Journal references Fellow David Bishop’s piece on technology fees

On April 14th, The Washington Business Journal referenced D.C. Policy Center Fellow David Bishop’s piece on technology fees on business licenses and permits in an article titled “D.C. has raised millions through an additional fee on businesses. A think tank wants to know where the money has gone.” “District businesses have paid…

April 14, 2017 | D.C. Policy Center

Senior Fellow Kate Rabinowitz quoted in beSpacific

On April 14th, Senior Fellow Kate Rabinowitz’s piece on why visualizing open data is not enough was quoted in beSpacific in a piece called “Commentary – Why Visualizing Open Data Isn’t Enough” “Kate Rabinowitz, D.C. Policy Center: “With a new proposed Data Policy, release of high profile datasets on topics like 311…

April 14, 2017 | D.C. Policy Center

Farm Produces Solutions for Urban Challenges | The Washington Informer

On April 12, The Washington Informer referenced D.C. Policy Center Fellow Randy Smith’s piece on Food Deserts in a piece titled “Farm Produces Solutions for Urban Challenges“. “Washingtonians who live east of the Anacostia River are more likely than anyone in the city to face unemployment and poverty and, according to a…

April 12, 2017 | D.C. Policy Center

Washington Blade references Fellow Becky Strauss’s piece on anti-poverty policies

On April 12th, Washington Blade referenced D.C. Policy Center Fellow Becky Strauss’s article on anti-poverty policies in an piece titled “Spend-more’ groups seek to kill D.C. tax relief, reform” “Notably, in a report this week, the D.C. Policy Center detailed how the District is a national leader in providing strong social supports…

April 12, 2017 | D.C. Policy Center

Washington Business Journal quotes Executive Director Yesim Taylor on Traffic Fine Revenue

On April 10th, Washington Business Journal quoted Executive Director Yesim Taylor in a piece examining traffic fine revenue. “Were the automated traffic enforcement revenue to go down, we could make up for it through our larger portfolio of taxes,” Taylor said. “But high collections do hook us to the revenue and makes…

April 10, 2017 | D.C. Policy Center

Washington City Paper quotes Executive Director Yesim Sayin Taylor on Mayor’s Budget

On April 6th, the Washington City Paper quoted D.C. Policy Center Executive Director Yesim Sayin Taylor in a piece on Mayor Bowser’s budget: “Yesim Taylor, executive director of the conservative-leaning D.C. Policy Center, praises the mayor’s business and estate tax cuts, and finds it interesting that Bowser has preserved half of the $200…

April 6, 2017 | D.C. Policy Center

Data viz whiz Kate Rabinowitz on the shortcomings of data viz | Technical.ly

On April 5th, technical.ly quoted D.C. Policy Center Senior Fellow Kate Rabinowitz’s article on open data in a piece titled “Data viz whiz Kate Rabinowitz on the shortcomings of data viz” “The increasing openness of city data is a great opportunity for citizens, researchers, journalists, and businesses,” Rabinowitz writes, “but the use…

April 5, 2017 | D.C. Policy Center

Study: Higher Frequency of Food Deserts in D.C. | Streetsense.org

On April 5th, streetsense.org referenced D.C. Policy Center Fellow Randy Smith’s piece on Food Deserts in Washington D.C. in a piece titled “Study: Higher Frequency of Food Deserts in D.C.” “Food-insecure areas make up about 11 percent of the total area of the District and exist in areas of poverty, according to…

April 5, 2017 | D.C. Policy Center

Can A $2 Flat Fare Save Metro?

On April 4, WAMU’s Martin Di Caro interviewed D.C. Policy Center Fellow D.W. Rowlands on whether a $2 flat fare can save Metro: Metro is most often compared to the New York subway system, which charges a flat fare of $2.75, but the nation’s busiest system handles six million daily trips –…

April 4, 2017 | D.C. Policy Center

Should D.C. Stick To Its Schedule To Cut Taxes? – DCist

On March 29, DCist quoted D.C. Policy Center Executive Director Yesim Sayin Taylor in a piece titled “Should D.C. Stick To Its Schedule To Cut Taxes?” “I think you can make an argument for spending more on affordable housing and education, but that we have fiscal distress in our future is not…

March 29, 2017 | D.C. Policy Center

Trump’s budget could plunge nation’s capital into recession – Associated Press

On March 28, D.C. Policy Center Executive Director was quoted in an article from the Associated Press on the potential impact of President Trump’s proposed budget: Yesim Sayin Taylor, executive director of the pro-business D.C. Policy Center, said major federal job cuts triggered that fiscal crisis, showing the city can experience a…

March 28, 2017 | D.C. Policy Center

Washington Times quotes D.C. Policy Center on minimum wage

On March 23, the Washington Times published an article with an interview with Yesim Sayin Taylor on the impact of the minimum wage increases on lower skilled District residents: Yesim Sayin Taylor, head of the D.C. Policy Center, said the results of the CFO’s report aren’t surprising and aren’t even necessarily a…

March 23, 2017 | D.C. Policy Center

“Could Donald Trump Create A Recession In D.C.?” WAMU article features D.C. Policy Center visualizations and analysis

As a part of their ongoing series on the “Trump Effect,” WAMU aired a segment on the potential impacts of the Present’s budget on the District and the broader Metropolitan area. The segment features maps on the federal workforce prepared by the D.C. Policy Center for the piece: Nearly one in six people in…

March 17, 2017 | D.C. Policy Center

WUSA Channel 9 covers the D.C. Policy Center’s study on food deserts

On March 17th, WUSA Channel 9 featured D.C. Policy Center fellow Randy Smith’s new study on food deserts: A new report by the D.C. Policy Center indicates that communities east of the Anacostia River are far more likely to live in a “food desert,” than their counterparts on the west side. The…

March 17, 2017 | D.C. Policy Center

Washington Times covers the launch of the D.C. Policy Center

On March 16th, 2017, the Washington Times published an article on the launch of the D.C. Policy Center: The D.C. Policy Center was launched last week under the direction of economist Yesim Sayin Taylor. Former Mayor Anthony Williams and other former members of the D.C. Tax Revision Commission founded the think tank at…

March 16, 2017 | D.C. Policy Center

Techinical.ly refers to Senior Fellow Kate Rabinowitz on demographic changes

On March 14th, Technical.ly referred to Senior Fellow Kate Rabinowitz’s piece on demographic change over the past decade in D.C. in an article titled “How has DC changed in 10 years? DataLensDC takes a look“. “Her latest blog post, originally written for the new D.C. Policy Center think tank, shows how race, income…

March 14, 2017 | D.C. Policy Center